When you think about it, it kind of makes sense.

The Eagles locker room is filled with a bunch of rich 20-somethings, each with at least some college level of education.

"These guys, they are grown men but they are kids too," Mark Sanchez said. "They like having fun, relaxing, taking a load off, it's a good place for gadgets."

Look left and you might see Malcolm Jenkins (or his hovering disciples) skidding by on a hoverboard. Look right and you'll see a player playing a game on his phone or using one of the dozens of hand-held devices on the market this holiday season.

In fact, ask an Eagles' player what his favorite holiday gift is, and he'll give you a tech-savvy answer.

"Best gift I ever got, I would have to say, at the time, it was an iPad," Brandon Graham said, thinking back a few Christmases. "I am really big with technology and stuff. When the first iPad came out that was my best."

RELATED LINK: The playoffs start Saturday for the Eagles

"I got a drone this year from my agent," Sanchez said, as he conveniently reached for a big glossy box tucked into his locker. "I am kind of excited about this."

Perhaps Chip Kelly, who has utilized technology as much as any head coach in the NFL, is leading the Eagles in this facet as well.

Kelly relies heavily on a sports science regimen to monitor his players' vital signs before and after practices and utilized tech as much as he can as a means for bettering his football team.

In 2014, the Eagles franchise invested over $1 million into Kelly's sports science philosophy. For Kelly it's less about being cool and more about keeping his players healthy.

"We don't do that just for the sake of doing it," Kelly told reporters a few seasons ago on the topic. "We do that because we think there's a benefit to it. Obviously, the big issues you look at are the soft tissue injures, because those are preventable."