Theater: Making ‘Scrambled Eggs’

Robin Amos Kahn is one half of the writing team behind "Scrambled Eggs," playing through May 11 at Theater Row's Beckett Theatre (www.scrambledeggstheplay.com). Credit: Christian Woods
Robin Amos Kahn is one half of the writing team behind “Scrambled Eggs,” playing through May 11 at Theater Row’s Beckett Theatre (www.scrambledeggstheplay.com).
Credit: Lilly Charles

 

Robin Amos Kahn is the mind behind “Scrambled Eggs,” a new, women-focused comedy now running off-Broadway. We sat down with the playwright, a former screenwriter for daytime soap operas, to chat about how much of this narrative — starring Amy Van Nostrand, and co-written by Gary Richards — comes from her own life experiences. Plus, how did she face the challenges of transitioning from writing major drama for the small screen to getting big laughs from a live audience?

What is “Scrambled Eggs” about?

For me, it’s really an everywoman’s story about this one character that’s very universal, about this certain crossroads that causes her to look back over her life. … She is physically going through certain symptoms that she doesn’t understand, and she’s at a place in her life where she’s wondering if she’s losing her mind.

How much of it is drawn from your own experiences?

Some of it is based on my own life. I’ve always had a lot of close girlfriends; so I’m always saying to them: “Are you going to do this? What happened to you? When you were dating, did you do this?” So all of those stories inform this play, because we are our relationships and friendships. … A lot of this is based on shared memories and shared experiences.

Is it just targeted to middle-aged women?

No. This character goes back over her entire life, [from] family life with her parents to her dating life. My daughter, who is 25, really relates to the younger period of dating. And men seem to love this play because it gives them insight into women in a way that they don’t usually have, and they also get to laugh at themselves and laugh at some of the foibles of women — at some of our craziness. … It definitely seems to touch people at different stages of their lives.

Did working with Gary Richards help add the men’s point of view?

The original story was that I was writing a solo show, and I was going to perform it. And I worked on it with a dramaturge. Then I completely chickened out and said, “Just give it to a good actress – I don’t want to get onstage and do it!” So we had an actress do a reading, and Gary, who’s a writer and a director said, “I think this would make a great play. Let’s bring all the characters to life.” So the two of us did that, and it evolved.

How was it moving from writing dramas for TV to a comedic play?

Comedy is much less challenging for me. Soaps are much more challenging. My analogy for writing soaps was that I was a ballerina with 30 pound weights attached to my feet. Everything I wrote, I wanted to be funny. There was one show I could be funny on, and that was “Guiding Light.” But every other show was very serious, and every time I wrote something funny they’d cross it out. … I admire great drama. I worship Tony Kushner, I wish I could write “Angels in America.” But I’m going to be me — it’s going to come from a much more humorous place, because that’s just who I am.

What’s your favorite moment in the play?

There’s a scene with the parents when the character was a child — and for me its about growing up in a family that’s really dysfunctional, and how do we do it as a child, and how do we feel good about ourselves when we’re in dysfunction. I actually wrote about it in a writing group once [and] tissues were passed around the room, and then I wrote it as a funnier piece now. [It’s] extremely poignant. So for me, that’s the moment. But there are a lot of them.

Where did the title come from?

The title actually came from [actor/writer] Eric Bogosian, who is one of my comic heroes. [He] read an early version, and he said, “I have the perfect title for you: ‘Scrambled Eggs.’” It just stuck. And when you see it, you’ll know why it’s a good title.



News
Entertainment
Sports
Lifestyle
Local

Newest java joint in bastion of hipness is…

Little may represent the change the neighborhood is undergoing right now like the arrival of the first Starbucks. The chain which is ubiquitous in Manhattan, opened a Williamsburg store at…

National

Black and white are the new orange at…

By Brendan O'Brien(Reuters) - Black and white are the new orange in a Michigan county where the sheriff has made a wardrobe change for jail…

National

Traps set after reports of giant snake on…

New Jersey animal control workers have set traps to snare a reported 20-foot-long serpent slithering through the waters of Lake Hopatcong.

Local

NYPD: Stroller carrying 2-year-old rolls onto Queens subway…

A 2-year-old girl in a stroller rolled onto subway tracks in Queens on Monday morning, police said.

Entertainment

‘The Leftovers’ recap: Season 1, Episode 4, ‘B.J.…

Last week’s episode of “The Leftovers” was apparently a fluke, because this week’s episode returns to focusing on the Garveys and it is so boring.…

Movies

Interview: Luc Besson says 'Lucy' is very different…

Filmmaker Luc Besson talks about his new film "Lucy," how it's different than "Limitless" and his crazy first conversation with Egyptian actor Amr Waked.

Music

Weezer releases first new song since 2010

Weezer releases "Back to the Shack," their first new song in almost six years.

Movies

Benedict Cumberbatch plays a different kind of genius…

The man known worldwide for his portrayal of London's eccentric private detective Sherlock Holmes is trading his Belstaff coat for tweed this fall. Benedict Cumberbatch…

NFL

'Vicktory dogs' travel road to rehabilitation seven years…

Of the dozens of dogs groomed by Bad Newz Kennels, 48 were rescued and 22 of the pit bull terriers have emerged at Best Friends Animal Society.

MLB

Yankees looking at trade for Cliff Lee, according…

Yankees looking at trade for Cliff Lee, according to report

NFL

Giants lineman Chris Snee to retire: Reports

The Giants report to training camp on Tuesday, but Chris Snee may not be there when they do.

NBA

Carmelo Anthony talks about his charity work in…

As he is used to doing every year, NBA All-Star Carmelo Anthony is going to visit Puerto Rico to do work for his foundation.

Tech

RocketSkates let users roll with a motor

Los Angeles company Acton has raised funds on Kickstarter to roll out a nifty alternative – motor-powered "RocketSkates."

Tech

Knicks star Carmelo Anthony becomes a tech entrepreneur

He's been an All-Star, an Olympian, and a celebrity spokesperson. Now NBA player Carmelo Anthony is adding the position "tech entrepreneur" to his resume. Along…

Tech

Ulises 1 is the world's first singing satellite

A group of artists and engineers in Mexico have unveiled Ulises 1, the world's first opera-singing satellite.

Home

Wallscape on a budget

Skip the wallpaper and ombre an accent wall instead.