A new law in New Jersey signed by Gov. Chris Christie Thursday formally criminalized the act of “upskirting,” or taking photos up a woman’s skirt without her consent. 

The new law prohibits the photographing, filming, publishing and sharing of images taken of the clothed intimate parts of another without her or her consent, and under circumstances in which a reasonable person would not expect to have his or her private body parts seen. 

Taking such photos is now a fourth-degree crime in the state, punishable by as much as 18 months in jail or $10,000 in fines, or both. Sharing such photos becomes a third-degree crime, punishable by up to 3-to-5 years in jail, a fine of $15,000, or both. 

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The law also provides provisions for victims to seek civil damages.

“As parents in this highly digital age, we’re always concerned about protecting our children and our privacy, and a big part of doing that is for state criminal laws to keep up with new and emerging technologies,” Christie said in a statement. “This new law targets perpetrators of a perverse and growing form of pornography that victimizes vulnerable women and children in a matter of seconds.” 

Similar bans throughout the country have been subject to judicial review, with courts sometimes finding the laws unconstitutional, noting the photographs are being taken in a public place. 

Upskirting is already banned by statutes in Massachusetts, Pennsylvania and New York.