Politically connectected businessman Sam Kuttab pleaded guilty in federal court Tuesday to using his connections to a municipal judge to influence a case against him.

Prosecutors say that in 2011, Municipal Court Judge James Waters called municipal court judges Dawn Segal and Joseph O’Neill to obtain a delay in, and ultimately the dismissal of,  a case involving an alarm company that had sued Kuttab’s real estate company for $2,700.

When the alarm company threatened to appeal, Waters urged Kuttab to reach a settlement in an effort to avoid scrutiny by higher courts.

In the end, the alarm company received just $400.

Luther Weaver, Kuttab’s attorney said Kuttab acknowledges that he used Waters’ influence to get the case dismissed.

“He just wants to end this case and get on with his life,” Weaver said.

Prosecutors say Kuttab, who runs a grocery store and manages real estate, raised money for Waters, hosting fundraising dinners and encouraging others to do the same as part of Waters 2009 campaign for the municipal judge’s seat.

That support, prosecutors say, earned the judge’s gratitude.

In one telephone conversation, Waters told the judge who ultimately dismissed the case that Kuttab was a friend.

“He’s a friend of mine, so if you can take a hard look at it….” Waters is heard saying.

After a little back and forth, the judge responds “no problem.”

Waters was sentenced to two years in prison on January for his role in the influence peddling scheme.

Just how Kuttab was able to get so close to Waters is unclear. In 2002 Kuttab was sentenced to 32 months in prison for failing to pay income taxes.

Segal and O’Neill were suspended by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court in September after Waters pleaded guilty while a disciplinary panel reviews the case.  Neither is charged with a crime.

Politically connectected businessman Sam Kuttab pleaded guilty in federal court Tuesday to using his connections to a municipal judge to influence a case against him.

Prosecutors say that in 2011, Municipal Court Judge James Waters called municipal court judges Dawn Segal and Joseph O’Neill to obtain a delay in, and ultimately the dismissal of,  a case involving an alarm company that had sued Kuttab’s real estate company for $2,700.

When the alarm company threatened to appeal, Waters urged Kuttab to reach a settlement in an effort to avoid scrutiny by higher courts.

In the end, the alarm company received just $400.

Luther Weaver, Kuttab’s attorney said Kuttab acknowledges that he used Waters’ influence to get the case dismissed.

“He just wants to end this case and get on with his life,” Weaver said.

Prosecutors say Kuttab, who runs a grocery store and manages real estate, raised money for Waters, hosting fundraising dinners and encouraging others to do the same as part of Waters 2009 campaign for the municipal judge’s seat.

That support, prosecutors say, earned the judge’s gratitude.

In one telephone conversation, Waters told the judge who ultimately dismissed the case that Kuttab was a friend.

“He’s a friend of mine, so if you can take a hard look at it….” Waters is heard saying.

After a little back and forth, the judge responds “no problem.”

Waters was sentenced to two years in prison on January for his role in the influence peddling scheme.

Just how Kuttab was able to get so close to Waters is unclear. In 2002 Kuttab was sentenced to 32 months in prison for failing to pay income taxes.

Segal and O’Neill were suspended by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court in September after Waters pleaded guilty while a disciplinary panel reviews the case.  Neither is charged with a crime.