Kareem Williams wants to talk to you about a girl he knows. Her name is Jodi Ann Arias.

That's the chorus of a rap Williams wrote -- he records under the name Lefty. It's also the truth. Willams a former South Philly resident, does in fact, want to talk about Jodi Arias.

Arias, for those that don't know, was sentenced to life in prison in April for murdering her ex-boyfriend Travis Alexander at his home in Mesa, Arizona after a trial featuring lurid sex stories, a conversion to Mormonism,  and a gorgeous defendant. 

Williams, a former South Philly resident who moved to Phoenix about 4 years ago, says Arias didn't get a fair trial because of the media hype around the trial.

And he bases this opinion on experience. He attended the trial every chance he got, and blogged about it on his site, realentertainmentnews.com

He uses the rap to settle scores with Phoenix-based TV newsman Troy Hayden, who he says used Arias' fame to gain national exposure, only to "stab her in the back," in subsequent coverage.

And he says too little attention has been given to the role Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder played in the murder. 

During the trial, Arias took the stand in her own defense, claiming that she was baptized as a Mormon while dating Alexander.  The couple regularly had anal and oral sex because Alexander believed those forms of penetration -- as opposed to vaginal intercourse -- didn't violate religious prohibitions about premarital relations. 

But she also testified that Alexander had become abusive, and that she killed him in self defense after he became enraged that she had dropped a camera. 

As bizarre as a rap about a cable news femme fatale may seem, Williams is surprisingly nuanced in his views. He expresses sympathy for Alexander's family. He recently told an interviewer for Phoenix New Times that he thinks a second-degree manslaughter convictions was more appropriate than murder.

But yeah, Williams says he knows people think it's weird. He says he's gotten death threats 

"I think it's unusual to people because they don't know how deep into the trial I am," Williams said. "When people don't know how deep into the game you are, they don't get it."

Williams is selling the song, which is titled "Jodi Ann Arias" on the iTunes store for $0.99. But $0.34 of that goes toward the Jodi Arias appeals fund. 

If it isn't you cup of tea, consider this: it's been listened to about 141,000 times through a free streaming service. Plus, Jodi's family likes it too.

"I talked to her aunt, her aunt said 'Thank you for writing that song,'" Williams said.