New U.S. school snack food rules clamp down on calories, fat

FadDiets

Snacks sold in U.S. schools must be lower in fat, salt and sugar, according to federal rules release Thursday aimed at giving students more nutritious options and fighting childhood obesity.

The regulations, originally due in 2011, largely mirror the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s proposal from February that limited the fat, salt and sugar content in school snacks and capped portion sizes.

The standards are seen as a critical step in improving students’ eating options under a 2010 law revamping school foods.

Many U.S. children eat more than half of their daily calories at school. The regulations will cover some 50 million children attending more than 100,000 schools that are part of the federal school lunch program.

The standards only apply to foods and beverages sold on school campuses during the day, and limit vending machine snacks to a maximum of 200 calories per item – less than, for example, many regular-sized candy bars.

Food sold at after-school activities, such as sporting events, is not subject to the regulations.

“This is an historic nutrition policy that will do a lot to improve children’s diets and address high rates of childhood obesity,” Margo Wooten, director of nutrition policy at the Center for Science in the Public Interest, told Reuters.

“Parents won’t have to worry their kids are using their money to buy junk foods and sugary drinks instead of buying a healthy lunch,” Wooten said.

All foods sold must meet competitive nutrient standards, meaning they must have fruits, vegetables, dairy or protein in them or contain at least 10 percent of the daily value of calcium, potassium, vitamin D or dietary fiber.

USDA gave the public 60 days to comment after it released its proposals in February. The final guidelines, while mostly unchanged, have incorporated a stricter calorie limit on drinks in high schools.

Twelve-ounce drinks cannot exceed 60 calories, less than the calorie count of most sodas.

And the portion sizes vary between age groups. Younger students will be able to buy water, 100 percent juice, and low-fat and fat-free milk in 8-ounce servings, while high school students can also purchase 20-ounce calorie-free drinks.

By improving the choices available to U.S. students outside of breakfast and lunch, officials hope to make a dent in childhood obesity in a nation where one-third of those under age 18 are considered overweight or obese.

“Nothing is more important than the health and well-being of our children,” said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, who has spoken often of his own negative experiences as an overweight child.

“You really can’t concentrate and you cannot be the student you were intended to be if you are worried about what people think of you, so weight has always been an issue for me,” Vilsack said in a speech in Portland, Maine in March.



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