Volunteers flock to save NYC’s Canada geese

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More than 500 local animal rights activists are staking out parks across the five boroughs to cry foul on the roundup and killing of Canada geese, a practice they say is barbaric and ineffective.

“New York City has contracted with USDA Wildlife Services, an agency known for its cruelty to animals,” said David Karopkin, the founder and director of GooseWatch NYC, which describes itself as a coalition of “animal advocates, pilots, biologists, veterinarians, policy makers, community leaders, and members of the general public.”

USDA agents round up the geese in the summer when they are molting and unable to fly, so the arrival of warm weather means the advocates are stepping up their vigilance.

Typically, once the geese are captured, the adults are separated from the chicks, after which they are either trucked away to be slaughtered—in some cases, donated to soup kitchens despite concerns about contaminated meat—or placed into mobile gas chambers to be asphyxiated.

The culling of New York City geese began in 2009, largely as a response to the bird strike that sent US Airways Flight 1549 down into the Hudson in January of that year.


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Comments

1

  1. Communities around the world are becoming more aware of the continued slaughters (not euthanasia) of these defenseless birds and their offspring and they are demanding that the carnage be stopped.

    These birds are rounded up during their flightless stage, along with their goslings, tossed into turkey crates, piled high upon each other. The parents are separated from their offspring and given that these birds are incredibly devoted parents, the stress of this alone is inhumane. They are then trucked hundreds of miles, usually in stifling heat to a “processing” plant.

    If they are not slaughtered they are gassed and for waterfowl this is especially cruel given that they are able to hold their breath for an extended length of time, increasing their suffering as they battle for the last breath of air in the gas chamber. Witnesses have actually heard the geese thumping against the walls of these chambers, fighting for their lives.

    Officials can no longer pan off the killings as merciful and charitable acts deemed necessary for the good of the public. The truth is out. Taxpayer money is being used to fund cruel, inhumane and barbaric acts and we will no longer stand by and watch wildlife become scapegoats and wiped out.

    We demand that NYC officials follow the lead of towns like Scarsdale, Mamaroneck and North Hempstead who have listened to the members of their respective communities who were outraged upon hearing the geese in their towns were to be killed.

    They need to review the quotes from the highly regarded experts who agree that killing is not the way to go. Aren’t we already on violence overload? Let’s start turning the tables and teach our children to find positive solutions to conflict- – human/human or human/wildlife conflict.

    As we are their voice now, wildlife will however one day get their say, when the earth can no longer stand the irresponsible actions of the human species. Leaving us with nothing.

    Once the wildlife is gone, so are we.