Opinion: Road map to recovery is a marathon, not a sprint

The finish line at the 117th Boston Marathon was filled with horror Monday instead of celebration. (Getty Images)
The finish line at the 117th Boston Marathon was filled with horror Monday instead of celebration. (Getty Images)

 

Catastrophe has a disgusting way of changing purpose. Classrooms were meant to harbor learning, not function as a deathtrap for our youth. Movie theatres were intended to house entertainment, not distract and execute innocent patrons. But just like Sandy Hook Elementary, 123 days ago, and the cinema in Aurora, Colo., 147 days before that, here it was: A sporting event in the foreground of a worldwide broadcast, displaying the images of a city – our city — infected with horror.

The legacy of Marathon Monday in Boston, a provincial pastime dating back to 1897, is forever changed. Going forward, the event may infamously be recognized as a forum of death and anguish. Perspective is blurred because the depth of Monday’s events are simply too recent to process. How can we? As I’m typing this, the 24/7 media circus is still releasing conflicting fatality and injury totals.

Once I heard, I refreshed my Facebook feed over and over to assure loved ones were OK, but since 3:30 p.m. Monday, I’ve been glued to my Twitter timeline – learning news 140 characters at a time. It’s a haze now. I remember processing the flow of information, becoming disoriented with images I wish I hadn’t seen, and audibly pondering the question on the tip of everyone’s tongue, “Why?” These things feel different when they happen to your city. They just do.

Hours earlier, I was writing a column about a 3-2 walk-off Red Sox win over the Rays, in a Patriots Day thriller that, for all intents and purposes, took place eons ago. At night, as I listened to the sirens of the racing ambulances on Washington Street, I’m reminded how close the vestigial terror is. The world is different now. I could sense it around me. I walked to the market to survey my Oak Square neighborhood. I immediately noticed how palpable the heightened pulse of the area felt. I simultaneously felt safe and insecure; angry and concerned; but most of all, I just felt crappy. I think we all did.

In the coming weeks, we’ll consume considerable regurgitation about how sports is an avenue towards escapism for fans looking to get away from the grating ebbs and flows of everyday life. A three hour vacation located miles away from things that count in The Grand Scheme of It All. The problem is Monday’s tragedy redefined normalcy. The illusion can no longer be replicated. Instead, we’re left pining for revenge to irrevocable actions and craving quick resolution. Sadly, it won’t be that easy. We’ll progress one day, hurt the next; feel vindicated, then distraught.
The truth is, every scar bleeds if you pick at it enough. The roadmap to recovery is a marathon, not a sprint.

Follow Metro sports columnist Ryan Hadfield on Twitter @Hadfield__



News
Entertainment
Sports
Lifestyle
National

At 91, Marvel creator Stan Lee continues to…

By Piya Sinha-RoyLOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Marvel Entertainment's chief emeritus Stan Lee may be in his ninth decade, but it hasn't stopped him from adding…

National

Islamic State says beheads U.S. journalist, holds another

Islamic State insurgents released a video purportedly showing the beheading of U.S. journalist James Foley, who had gone missing in Syria nearly two years ago.

Local

VIDEO: NYPD seeks shooter in East New York…

Cops are on the lookout for an unknown shooter who aimed and missed hitting a man on a bicycle, instead nearly striking a nearby officer in East New York.

Local

NYS state forces thrift shops comply with ban…

Nine New York City thrift shops were reprimanded by the state attorney general for selling children's clothes with drawstrings around the neck and waist.

Television

'Pretty Little Liars' recap: Season 5, Episode 11,…

Caleb's not a ghost. Spencer might still be an attempted murderer. And Hanna's going to die next week. In other words, we actually got some…

Movies

At 91, Marvel creator Stan Lee continues to…

Marvel Entertainment's Stan Lee is adding outposts to his creative empire to interest a new generation of children in super heroes of all shapes and sizes.

Television

Mira Sorvino explores immortality on 'Intruders'

Mira Sorvino's new show "Intruders" centers around a secret society that achieves immortality by taking over the bodies of other people.

Television

5 things you need to know about new…

"Doctor Who" returns Saturday with a new star, Peter Capaldi. Here's some things to know about him (mainly his turn as sweary spin doctor Malcolm Tucker).

MLB

Shane Greene travels unlikely road to Yankees stardom

Shane Greene was throwing a bullpen session on a quiet field at Daytona Beach Community College one day when the ball started moving.

NFL

2014 Fantasy Football: Rankings, list of top NFL…

2014 Fantasy Football: Rankings, list of top NFL tight ends (TE)

MLB

MLB Power Rankings: Angels supplant A's, Nationals climb

MLB Power Rankings: Angels supplant A's, Nationals climb

NFL

David Wilson returns to triple jump, sets sights…

Giants fans know David Wilson can jump. They are just more used to seeing him go for backflips, not distance.

Style

11 timeless gifts for registries or just because

Gifts to prove you're a style maven once and for all.

Parenting

How everyday moments can inspire kids' creativity

"The Artist's Way for Parents" author Julia Cameron gives advice on how parents and children can be creative together.

Tech

How to stay safe online

Stop worrying about keeping your online passwords safe, and start worrying about keeping your username a secret. Actually, worry about both. According to Shaun Murphy…

Tech

OpenTable now lets you pay your bill via…

The restaurant app OpenTable added the ability to pay your bill (and tip) with your phone, thus cutting back on a few dining annoyances.