Texas residents seek healing at church after deadly blast

Church goers bow their heads in prayer during an open air Sunday service four days after a deadly fertilizer plant explosion in the town of West, near Waco, Texas on April 21, 2013. REUTERS/Adrees
The scene of the deadly fertilizer plant explosion in the town of West, near Waco, Texas on April 21, 2013. REUTERS/Adrees

Hundreds of residents of the close-knit town of West, Texas sought healing at a church service on Sunday, as schools were readied to reopen and authorities investigated the cause of this week’s deadly fertilizer plant blast.

About 200 residents – including farmers, veterans and migrant workers – packed into Church of the Assumption in the center of the town for Catholic mass early on Sunday.

Father Boniface Onjefu offered prayers for the 14 dead, among them local volunteer firefighters and emergency workers and nearly 200 injured in the blast that smashed several city blocks.

“West is a strong city,” Onjefu told the congregation packed into the church, the altar decorated with a spray of white blossoms.

Residents of the tiny town, about 80 miles south of Dallas and less than 20 miles north of Waco, stood together “in these trying moments,” he said.

“Let us be strong and move our beloved city ahead. God is with us. God bless us,” Father Onjefu said.

The blaze and ensuing explosion at West Fertilizer Co, a privately owned retail facility, gutted a 50-unit apartment complex, demolished about 50 houses and battered a nursing home and several schools. Dozens more homes were reported to have been damaged.

The cause of the blast, which was so powerful that it registered as a 2.1 magnitude earthquake, remains under investigation. Neither the cause or the location of the fire that preceded it have been determined, say investigators.

Power, water and gas are still turned off in blast-ravaged parts of the city of 2,700 residents, which remains under a 7 p.m. CDT curfew. Mayor Tommy Muska said a local area school would reopen on Monday with some students in temporary classrooms.

There will be a memorial service for the first responders in Waco at 2 p.m. local time on Thursday.

Some of those evacuated from a devastated area north of the historic downtown have been allowed home but only to retrieve a few belongings. Muska warned the recovery will “be a marathon, not a sprint.”

Larry Kaska, who lost his home on the north side of town, said the mass led by Onjefu at the brick-built church brought “some healing” to residents as they started to rebuild their shattered lives.

“We’re turning … getting back to some normalcy again,” said Kaska, who is now living at his nephew’s home. “Just hearing his prayers and comfort, and (knowing) that people are being supportive … help you out.”

Authorities have said there was no indication of foul play at the plant, which was last inspected for safety in 2011, according to a risk management plan filed with the federal Environmental Protection Agency.

But for some at the Catholic church service, it was too early to speak of healing. Among them Silvestre Duran, a Mexican migrant whose care worker wife, Lucy, was injured as the blast tore through the nursing home where she worked.

“It will take time, a lot of people have memories that will be with them for a long time,” Silvestre said, noting that his wife has suffered flashbacks since the blast.

“I’m doing a little better, but still dealing with the memories,” said Lucy, speaking in Spanish. She was wrapped up against the slight chill in a black shawl, her face marked by burns and multiple stitches in her right ear.

Their daughter, who also worked at the nursing home, was injured in the explosion as well.

Another churchgoer, who identified himself only as a farmer who had lived in West all his life, was still struggling to come to terms with the toll on the town.

“I lost three of my best friends … I should have been maybe there with” them, he said, clearly shaken. “I just consider myself and my family blessed … If you don’t have faith in the Good Lord, you have nothing.”

 



News
Entertainment
Sports
Lifestyle
National

California passes 'yes-means-yes' campus sexual assault bill

Californian lawmakers passed a law on Thursday requiring universities to adopt "affirmative consent" language in their definitions of consensual sex, part of a nationwide drive to curb sexual assault on…

National

Syrian refugees top 3 million, half of all…

By Stephanie NebehayGENEVA (Reuters) - Three million Syrian refugees will have registered in neighboring countries as of Friday, but many remain trapped by the advance…

International

North Korean leader's money manager defects in Russia:…

A senior North Korean banking official who managed money for leader Kim Jong Un has defected in Russia and was seeking asylum in a third country, a South Korean newspaper…

Local

MAP: New York City Street Closures August 29,…

The Department of Transportation and NYPD said there may be residual delays near all of the street closures on August 29, 31 and 31. Several streets and avenues will be…

Going Out

'Friends' coffeehouse Central Perk coming to NYC —…

"Friends" is coming back for a one-off special: "The One with the Free Coffee." Warner Bros. is bringing a pop-up replica of Central Perk, the…

Movies

Interview: 'As Above, So Below' directors: 5 ways…

The fraternal directors of the found footage horror "As Above, So Below" dish on the best ways to frighten the bejesus out of audiences.

Movies

Criterion's new Jacques Demy box mixes the light…

Jacques Demy, the most effervescent of French New Wave filmmakers, gets a Criterion box all to himself, with classics like "The Umbrellas of Cherbourg."

Entertainment

Comedian Joan Rivers, 81, rushed to New York…

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Acerbic comedian and fashion critic Joan Rivers was rushed to Mount Sinai Hospital in New York on Thursday after she reportedly…

NFL

3 things we learned in the Giants preseason…

The final score didn’t matter — a 16-13 win by the Giants — but it would’ve been nice to finally see Big Blue’s new-look offense get on track.

NFL

NFL Power Rankings: Seahawks, Broncos, Patriots, 49ers start…

NFL Power Rankings: Seahawks, Broncos, Patriots start at top

U.S. Soccer

5 facts about new England captain Wayne Rooney

Manchester United striker Wayne Rooney was named as the new England captain by coach Roy Hodgson on Thursday.

NFL

Jets vs. Eagles: 3 things to watch

A win on Thursday night at the Eagles would give the Jets a 3-1 record and just their second winning preseason under head coach Rex Ryan.

Style

Trend: White hot on the 2014 Emmy's red…

White was one of the big trends on the Emmy's red carpet.

Food

Recipe: Samuel Adams beer-marinated grilled shrimp

Summer calls for two things: a cold beer and light food. Sam Adams' Latitude 48 IPA fairly bursts with citrus notes, making it an ideal marinade…

Wellbeing

4 healthy ingredient swaps to make your meals…

When it comes to eating well, everyone knows they could be doing better. But cooking in an apartment on a busy schedule is a recipe…

Wellbeing

Heart trumps brain when it comes to movies…

When you need a good cry, do you reach for the movie that’s “based on a true story”? Science says you’re giving your brain far…