(Reuters) - Penn State University's president says a re-evaluation of the school's fraternity system may be needed after a fraternity was suspended for posting online photographs of nude women, some of them apparently unconscious.

In a statement on Penn State's website, President Eric Barron said he was "shocked and angered by the apparent disregard for not only the law, but also human dignity." Barron called the images showing the women naked or partially clothed "highly inappropriate and disturbing."

The Kappa Delta Rho fraternity was suspended as of March 3, accused of hosting private Facebook pages and posting pictures that members took of mostly undressed women who were passed out or sleeping. The pages had about 150 members including students and alumni, according to local media.

"This evidence, which is still being gathered by the State College Police, is appalling, offensive and inconsistent with our community’s values. This is not only completely unacceptable behavior, but also potentially criminal," Barron said in the statement, dated on Wednesday and addressed to "the Penn State community."

Barron said the university was working with the national Kappa Delta Rho headquarters to determine if, and under what conditions, the fraternity would have a presence at the school.

"It also brings us to a point where we must ask if a re-evaluation of the fraternity system is required. Some members of the university senior leadership believe it is, and we are considering our options," Barron added.

He said the investigation was still in the early stages and that there were no named suspects yet.

The national Kappa Delta Rho fraternity said the suspension would last a year and the local chapter would be re-organized.

(Reporting by Ellen Wulfhorst; Editing by Will Dunham)