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The Short Answer -- Part 2

Mike Turzai has a full dance card, and Jim Kenney communes with the dead.
Left to Right: Doug Oliver, Jim Kenney, Tony Williams, Nelson Diaz, Lynne Abraham Provided

There's a lot of reporting on the 2015 mayoral race. Some of it is good, even admirable. Most of it is very long, and you know…. that’s not what we do here at Metro.  

Welcome to Week 2 of The Short Answer.

Each week, we ask the mayoral candidates a question. Some will deal with personality, others policy. We give them 50 words to answer it, and yes, we do chop it down if we have to.   

Got a question? Send it to dan.kelley@metro.us

This week’s question is: Name a person with whom you disagree politically that you would like to have dinner with. Why?

I’d have dinner with former Governor, Tom Corbett. I’d want to better understand his position on public education, particularly here in Philadelphia. He chose not to reinvest in our schools and I’d be interested in hearing what could have been more important than investing our children’s future. — Doug Oliver

I'd say Rep. John Taylor.  We disagree on a number of issues, but have been able to find common ground to pass meaningful legislation that has helped thousands of people. I'd break bread with him anytime. — State Sen. Anthony Williams

Pennsylvania State House Speaker Mike Turzai and Senate Majority Leader Jake Corman, both Republicans. We don’t see eye-to-eye on most issues, but I think we can find common ground to move Philadelphia and Pennsylvania forward. If I could work with Newt Gingrich in the 90s, I can work with them.  — Nelson Diaz

I would choose Pennsylvania Speaker of the House, Mike Turzai. Philadelphia Public Schools deserve the same per-student allotment that's received by affluent suburban schools. As mayor, I would go to Harrisburg and have dinner with every Harrisburg leader — Republican and Democrat — until our schools get their fair share. — Lynne Abraham

Ronald Reagan. Our next mayor needs to be able to bring people from all political orientations and walks of life together in order to tackle our city's challenges. I think I would benefit in that regard from talking to someone with a very different perspective from my own. — Jim Kenney

 

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