Overheard among chatting Eagles fans during last weekend's open practice at Lincoln Financial Field were musings that this season's wide receiver corps is possibly the weakest in recent memory.

Jordan Matthews — entering his third year after a solid but not spectacular sophomore season — leads a WR room of never-weres and has-beens, like disappointments Nelson Agholor and Josh Huff, along with veterans Reuben Randle and Chris Givens and a few other undrafted free agents.

Make room for one more.

Early Tuesday the Eagles announced they had traded journeyman offensive tackle Dennis Kelly to the Titans for troubled wide receiver Dorial Green-Beckham. 

DGB, as he's often called, was forced to transfer from Missouri to Oklahoma due to some off-field issues, and has three times had legal troubles — most of which stem from drugs or marijuana. 

But, when he's on the field he can be quite the force.

"He's physically gifted," Eagles president of football operations Howie Roseman said. "He's 6-foot-5, 204 pounds, he runs a 4.4 40 [yard dash], he's got a rare skill set but there's a reason he's available at this time. He has to get more consistent but to us it's a risk that's worth taking."

As a rookie, Green-Beckham caught 32 passes for 549 yards and two touchdowns. His big body could be just what the Eagles need to run a meaningful slant or fade route.

"We've done our due diligence to the extent that we can and there's nothing that we've seen that makes us think there is anything going on," Roseman said of the 40th overall pick in 2015.

Doug Pederson has had his share of off-field issues to deal with already during his tenure as head coach, but he welcomes anyone with talent to help his club.

"I kind of take a chip off of Andy Reid's block," Pederson told the media Tuesday. "We had a Michael Vick who had definitely situations there.

"I'm going to preface this by saying we are not in the rehabilitation business. But at the same time, we feel like with the staff that I've assembled on offense and with the personnel staff upstairs, that we can bring guys in that might have had a little bit of a history and we can help these players not only become young men, but become good football players."