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Zoo Kid becomes King Krule

King Krule has been making music out of South London long enough to hop genres and gather a solid following, alternately as Zoo Kid.

At 19, King Krule has been making music out of South London long enough to hop genres and gather a solid following, alternately as Zoo Kid, Edgar the Beatmaker, DJ JD Sports and King Krule.

The first full-length, 6 Feet Beneath the Moon, has the artist debuting stateside with visits to Letterman and Conan this past week. Archy Marshall, the redhead in signature oversized-blazer, went to the music high that helped mold Adele. His sound has been compared to The Jam, Morrissey and Tom Waits, with sparse guitar lines and bass-ridden baritone. But his persona matches the devil-may-care sort of ennui of Earl Sweatshirt and Tyler the Creator, both fans of the ginger crooner.

King Krule’s catalogue is the product of heartache and lonely late nights on hard city streets. Merging jazz and breakbeat, compositions tell melancholy tales colored in teen intensity. With a heavy accent, deciphering the pain challenges American ears and is part of the fun in discovering what the Zoo Kid has to say as King.

King Creole was a hit for Elvis in 1958. The song describes a New Orleans bluesman with the ability to wow the crowd like no other, “He don’t stop playing till his guitar breaks.” Krule is a new artist with a look and sound unlike any other. He has much to say on his new record and delivers his poetry with art in an urban neighborhood style. If Oliver Twist studied up on his Wu Tang and took a dubstep approach to electric guitar it might sound like a King Krule record. His is a fresh take on old favorites, envisioned through a unique lens and framed in floppy blazer and sneakers.

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