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Boston voter turnout 34 percent as of Election night

As of 6 p.m., more than 131,000voters had turned out at polling stations.
Voters will make their voices heard Tuesday.Getty Images

Boston city officials reported that as of 6 p.m., 131,622 people, or about 34 percent of registered Boston voters, had cast ballots in the 2014 Massachusetts General election.

Polls opened at 7 a.m., and will remain open until 8 p.m. There are 380,000 registered voters in Boston, according to city officials, and more than 150 polling locations.

Randy Dinsmore, a 34-year-old mover from Boston, said he typically votes based on the candidate, not the party.

"I feel politics is so beyond us regular people that I end up voting for the person that I don’t like the least," he said. "I liked Baker better than Coakley. He seemed like he was more in touch, I guess. At least with me."

He added, "When it comes to politicians, it all seems so crooked. Our best guy just died, you know what I mean?"

Sasha Kaufmann, a 31-year-old social worker from Boston, meanwhile, voted for Coakley.

"I identify as a gay person and she’s been very strong for the LGBT community as well her work for equal pay. I also heard a lot about Charlie Baker was trying to restrict the welfare system and I didn't like that, particularly considering how our economy is today."

Boston Mayor Martin Walsh told the State House News Service Tuesday that he believes interest in three of the four ballot questions will drive labor voters to the polls and boost the Democratic ticket.

Walsh, a former state lawmaker and labor leader, said the questions on casino gambling, the gas tax and earned sick time are driving labor interest.

Of the over 1,700 election officers working the polls, over 400 are fluent in second languages. Boston has a total of 255 precincts.

All precincts will have English and Spanish ballots. English/Chinese and English/Vietnamese ballots will be available in precincts where the population requires them.

Interpreters will be available to assist voters in Chinese - both Mandarin and Cantonese dialects -Vietnamese, Haitian Creole, Cape Verdean and Russian as well as a number of other languages, at locations across the City.

Inquiries regarding voter status made by email to the Boston Election Department should include the voter’s name, date of birth, and any associated residential addresses to ensure timely responses. The email address for the Boston Election Department is election@boston.gov and the telephone number is 617-635-3767.

Boston residents can visit www.cityofboston.gov for information on polling locations throughout the city.

Stay with Metro for updates on Tuesday's election.

 
 
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