Few would call Debbie Harry a geek, but the gorgeous Blondie singer has no problem with technology. In fact, she’s always embraced electronic innovation.

 

“That’s part of our business, really,” Harry said. “We rely on technology to produce our music and perform concerts. A lot of our instruments are tied to computer or synthesizer technology.

 

“The change from analog to digital, that was a big change. But it’s sort of more natural in a way; it’s the way the brain actually operates, instead of the old mechanical way. I don’t feel like a Luddite in any way.”

 

Personal evolution is important, too; so the band’s fall tour is not about revisiting their splendid hit songs like Heart of Glass or Dreaming.

 

The New York City-based new wave pop veterans’ new album, Panic of Girls, is out this month to add new sounds.

 

“I think that’s the best part of it,” Harry says of recording a new album.

“We are in a very cushy position, because we are well known. But going around playing the older hits and everything wouldn’t be, oh, I don’t know … it just wouldn’t be as inspiring or interesting as trying to make new music.

“Let’s face it: As our lives change, our experiences change and our insights improve. It’s more relevant to sing or talk about things that are happening today.

“The world is changing so quickly. The difference in communications since the Internet came into being — the world is so different now and we’re a part of it.”

On the web

Panic of Girls is exclusively available through Amazon. Debbie Harry explains the partnership: “Because we’re independent, we don’t have any distribution — so it’s an ideal situation for us. On a personal level, I’ve been dealing with Amazon as a consumer for a long time. Anytime I’ve gotten anything from Amazon, it’s been quick and painless.”