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Dinner and a movie, courtesy of Moore College of Art and Design

Moore College of Art and Design debuts Film al Fresco.

photo: Kara Crombie's cartoon for grown ups, "Suffering Heroes," will be screened on Friday. Kara Crombie's cartoon for grown ups, "Suffering Heroes," will be screened on Friday.

Moore College of Art and Design is giving us all the chance to get seriously local. In their first ever Film al Fresco, Moore entices Philadelphians with two of the things we love most: movies and food. And not just any old flick and fare, here, either. The emphasis is on local, independent, and well-crafted pieces.

Each Friday in June and July (excluding July 5), the college welcomes everyone to sprawl out at Aviator Park and watch screenings of films created by some of Philadelphia’s finest artists. This week you can feel like you’re a grown up doing kid things.

One of the films to be screened on June 28 is "Suffering Heroes" by Kara Crombie. Her animated movies are no stranger to the Philadelphia art world, with previous showings at Vox Populi and the Rowan University Art Gallery. These cartoon flicks aren’t necessarily for kids, though.

“Suffering Heroes is the sixth installment in an animated series called Aloof Hills, which revolves around the adventures of characters on a civil war era planation,” explains Crombie. “This episode focuses on a musically gifted slave named Alphabet Soup who is forced to perform for a camp of Union soldiers. To me it is an updated version of the story of Job.”

To go with all this grown-up animation are food trucks, which will serve adult versions of childhood favorites. This is your chance to double down on local flavors with both food and art. The Lil’ Pop Shop truck will be there, so instead of sucking the dyed slushy sugar out of a plastic freeze pop casing, enjoy a thoughtfully crafted popsicle. Also in attendance will be Don Tacos Memo and Little Baby’s Ice Cream.

“This series seems like a great way to bring people together, activate an underused space in the center of our city, and offer a nostalgic summer pastime in the great outdoors,” says Pete Angevine of Little Baby’s. “I've personally had my eye on this since they were awarded the Knight Arts grant to make it happen, and we're excited to be involved.”

 
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