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Fall festival: New ballet troupes debut at the Joyce

Ballet v6.0, a new festival curated by Martin Wechsler, brings emerging ballet troupes from around the country to the 500-seat Joyce Theater, each for two performances.

This image is from Gregory Dawson's "Which Light in the Sky Is Us?" Credit: Provided Dancers perform Gregory Dawson's "Which Light in the Sky Is Us?"
Credit: Provided

Ballet v6.0, a new festival curated by Martin Wechsler, brings emerging ballet troupes from around the country to the 500-seat Joyce Theater, each for two performances. Beginning with Philadelphia’s BalletX (directed by Christine Cox and Matthew Neenan, alums of Pennsylvania Ballet) tonight and Wednesday, it continues with Dominic Walsh Dance Theater, based in Houston (Thursday and Saturday), and then Company C Contemporary Ballet from the Bay Area.

Charles Anderson, formerly of the New York City Ballet, formed Company C after he moved to the West Coast in 1999. “I had the ability to be a curator,” says Anderson. “My biggest choreography is the building of the company itself. The star is the works we bring.” These include dances by Yuri Zhukov and Patrick Corbin, and his own “Polyglot,” which aligns vocal accents with movement styles; see them Friday and Saturday.

Next up (Aug. 12 and 13) is Whim W’him, the brainchild of Belgian choreographer Olivier Wevers, who performed with Seattle’s Pacific Northwest Ballet for 14 years. He’ll show three pieces, including a reinvention of Bournonville choreography, a dance to Mozart featuring 10 performers and a sofa and “Monster” — about homophobia, addiction and tempestuous relationships.

A group of NYCB dancers bring BalletCollective, a collaboration including live music, Aug. 14 and 15. The series concludes with Jessica Lang Dance, Aug. 16 and 17. Based in New York, Lang’s troupe makes its local debut with a comic ballet to the music of Schumann, plus another with video projections and a score made from liquid sounds.

If you go


Ballet v6.0
Aug. 6-17
Joyce Theater,
175 Eighth Avenue;
$10-$39;
212-242-0800, www.joyce.org
 
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