Basing a dance on a visual art work is a minefield. Actually collaborating with one, as choreographer Dean Moss does with Korean sculptor Sungmyung Chun in “Nameless Forest,” can be equally hazardous. Even if the artist likes what you’re doing, you’re still charged with turning still things into moving things — no easy task.

 

Chun himself recycles images from popular culture, and Moss integrates audience members into his piece. Watching the hour-long work is like coming upon characters from “Lost.” First the six performers quietly invite a dozen paying customers to sit onstage.

 

Like a beached sea-creature, Aaron Hodges slowly propels himself on his stomach. Kacie Chang and Sari Nordman, functioning like flight attendants, lead them into a heap. The women stand before the “volunteers” and bathe themselves with yellow flower petals. The voice of combat photographer Michael Kamber narrates tales of battlefield atrocities. The men strip one guy, then the volunteers are encouraged to comfort the naked man while cast members hold poses taken from Chun’s sculptures. It’s all a big mess, but it’s hard to look away.