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Marching to the beat of their own drum

<p>Sleigh Bells have a big sound for such a little group. Guitarist Derek Miller turns his Marshall stacks up to 11 and plays to beats so bass-y that your heart’ll rattle in your rib cage as Alexis Krauss alternates between flirty coos and cheerleader chants. But some people think their sound could be even bigger.</p>

Sleigh Bells have a big sound for such a little group. Guitarist Derek Miller turns his Marshall stacks up to 11 and plays to beats so bass-y that your heart’ll rattle in your rib cage as Alexis Krauss alternates between flirty coos and cheerleader chants. But some people think their sound could be even bigger.


“We get a ton of drummers writing us,” says Miller, “and it’s always really flattering and we always respond, but it’s just not in the cards right now.”


Drummers are likely attracted to the duo and asking to join them because the rhythms Miller programs on his laptop are so bombastic that they’re often just shy of overpowering the songs. But because the sounds are unique enough, the tunes end up taking a ride on the beats instead.


“There was a reason why I didn’t record regular rock snare drums and rock ‘n’ roll kick drum sounds, and that’s because I’m bored of them,” he says. “I can’t stand them, for me, at least. I mean, I listen to plenty of bands, but for Sleigh Bells I couldn’t do anything interesting with them.”