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‘Marshall’ is so sleek and confident you’ll forgive it for being predictable

Chadwick Boseman and Josh Gad make for an entertaining leading pair, too.
Josh Gad and Chadwick Boseman in Marshall
[Photo: Open Road Films]

‘Marshall’

Director: Reginald Hudlin

Stars: Chadwick Boseman, Josh Gad, Sterling K. Brown, Kate Hudson, Dan Stevens, James Cromwell

Rating: PG-13

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3.5 (Out Of 5) Globes

Plot: Chadwick Boseman plays a young Thurgood Marshall, who is faced with one of his greatest ever challenges while working as an NAACP lawyer. Marshall travels up to Connecticut to assist Joseph Spell (Sterling K. Brown), a chauffeur accused of raping and trying to murder wealthy socialite Eleanor Strubing (Kate Hudson). Marshall has to work in tandem with Sam Friedman (Josh Gad), a young Jewish lawyer that has never actually tried a criminal case. Against the odds the pair build a defense, all while having to contend with the racism and anti-Semitism that is inherent in the town, and has led most of them to assume Spell is guilty.

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Review: While “Marshall” might not possess the originality or the requisite amount of surprising twist and turns to make a huge impact, it is so unwavering in its intent to showcase the prejudice that African Americans and Jews have suffered over the last century that you’d have to be incredibly callous not to be affected. Especially since it is buoyed by its incredible cast, which enhance the biopic and are able to make even the entirely predictable teem with drama and charisma. Those of you that are somehow yet to be charmed or convinced by Chadwick Boseman will have no more excuses after “Marshall”, as he is a force of nature, strutting with a confidence that oozes across the film, while his patter and partnership with Gad is particularly delightful. Kudos to Sterling K Brown, too, who is able to make Joseph Spell rich and complex despite a brief amount of screen-time. Reginal Hudlin’s sleek direction meshes perfectly with Boseman’s confidence, too, and helps to glide over “Marshall’s” shortcomings, which ultimately makes for a lively and more than palatable experience. 

 
 
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