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‘Thoroughbreds’ stars talk the sudden death of Anton Yelchin

‘What has been really good about touring this film right now is learning he was just so unanimously loved’
Anton Yelchin in Thoroughbreds
[Image: Focus Features]

The death of Anton Yelchin shook the cinematic community to its very core.

Not just because the 27-year-old had wowed audiences with his performances in the “Star Trek” trilogy, “Like Crazy,” “Terminator Salvation,” “Only Lovers Left Alive” and “Green Room,” but because the stunning future portrayals that he was undoubtedly going to give were suddenly erased.

“Thoroughbreds” marks the final posthumous release for Yelchin, who died on June 19, 2016, just 14 days after the film had concluded filming.

I recently had the chance to speak to “Thoroughbreds” stars Olivia Cooke and Anya Taylor-Joy about the wickedly funny thriller, during which time I asked the pair about working with Yelchin and what made him such a special talent.


“He was such a force of nature,” Taylor-Joy told me. “And what has been really good about touring this film right now is learning he was just so unanimously loved.”

“It is so wonderful to watch everyone connect with him, and I think he had that ability to take on quirky and strange characters and imbue them with such heart.”

“You really feel for him. Whenever I watch the movie I am really rooting for him. I don’t think we’re supposed to do that. Because none of our characters are particularly wonderful.”

“I think what he really brings to the film; we have hopefully presented you with two very measured and subdued performances and he is this lightning crack that comes in and electrifies everything and really creates a contrast between the two girls.”

Taylor-Joy concluded by giving Yelchin the ultimate compliment, as she declared, “The film wouldn’t be as strong if he wasn’t in it.”

“Thoroughbreds,” which revolves around two upper class teenager girls coming together to try and solve both of their problems, will be released in cinemas on March 9.

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