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Must-read books, week of Nov. 11

It’s too cold to go out. Stay in and curl up with one of these new releases.

Ron Burgundy pens autobiography, "Let Me Off At The Top." Oh yes, there's a whole chapter devoted to the anchorman's hair.

“Let Me Off at the Top! My Classy Life & Other Musings” by Ron Burgundy
You don’t have to wait until the release of “Anchorman: The Legend Continues” to hear some of Ron Burgundy’s wise words. The anchorman, played by Will Ferrell, is releasing a classy new book Nov. 19, and while it doesn’t smell of rich mahogany, it does include plenty of personal anecdotes. From dispelling myths about his hair to his secret to musings about the women he’s loved, Burgundy’s short stories are personal and detailed. Sometimes too detailed.

"Downton Abbey" fans rejoice! Lady Catherine's book is just as addictive as the show. "Downton Abbey" fans rejoice! Lady Catherine's book is just as addictive as the show.

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“Lady Catherine, the Earl, and the Real Downton Abbey” by The Countess of Carnarvon
“Downton Abbey” fans will devour this new true story, written by the countess whose first book inspired the show. After her last book spent nearly a year on the New York Times best-seller list, the royal author is back with another page-turner full of royal scandal and affairs. In the book, a divorced Lady Catherine faces the heartache of war when her husband, ex-husband and son all join the military.

"The Ministry of Guidance Invites You Not To Stay" by Hooman Majd Moving from Brooklyn to Iran? Way more of a culture shock than moving to the suburbs.

“The Ministry of Guidance Invites You Not to Stay: An American Family in Iran” by Hooman Majd
Moving from Greenpoint, Brooklyn, to Iran proves to be quite the culture shock in this true story, written by Iranian-American journalist Hooman Majd. Majd’s wife is from the Midwest and doesn’t blend in so easily – even when wearing a head scarf. The challenges they face range from trivial (hunting for booze) to serious (it’s 2011 and U.S.-Iran relations are not exactly friendly) make this book as entertaining as it is heartwarming.

 
 
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