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Souls: Still Bouncing after all these years

“We’re gonna keep playing as long as we’re having fun and enjoying making music together,” says Pete Steinkopf, guitarist of veteran punk band the Bouncing Souls. “We’ll play till we can’t walk anymore.”

It’s been 23 years since the Bouncing Souls burst onto the scene of the
punk haven that is New Brunswick, N.J., the home of Rutgers University.
According to Pete Steinkopf, guitarist for the band, little has changed
in the city that has recently churned out punk giants like Streetlight
Manifesto and the Gaslight Anthem.

“I think it’s so cool that New
Brunswick has consistently had a basement show scene that’s going on
since we lived there in the late ‘80s, early ‘90s,” Steinkopf says.
“There’s always a generation of kids having shows in the basement, and
there’s always cool music and cool bands coming out of there.”

Steinkopf
says the band sought to reconnect with these roots to make “an
old-school-inspired Bouncing Souls record” when they created their
newest LP, “Comet.”

Although “Comet” contains the fast, youthful
sound of the Bouncing Souls’ earlier days, the album also bears a more
mature nod to mortality. On the title track, vocalist Greg Attonito
sings, “We’re no longer asking why as we start to realize/Change, it’s
just a part of life.”

Steinkopf admits the Bouncing Souls are not
getting any younger, but says also the aging process is the source of
the band’s continued inspiration.

“We’re learning to grow all the time as people,” Steinkopf says.

Does Steinkopf see the Souls taking a cue from Jersey forefather Bruce Springsteen and having a career as long as the Boss?

“We’re
gonna keep playing as long as we’re having fun and enjoying making
music together,” Steinkopf says. “We’ll play till we can’t walk
anymore.”

Warped Tour: Then vs. now

When the Vans Warped
Tour revolved around punk music, the Bouncing Souls were a festival
staple. Looking at the 2012 Warped Tour lineup, it’s not easy to tell
the event was once founded on the DIY ethos of punk music.

“I think
it has to adjust with the climate of what’s going on in the music
scene,” Steinkopf says of Warped Tour. “And that’s always changing.”

Although
Steinkopf sees the different musical tastes of a younger generation, he
says punk rock will always have its place at Warped Tour.

 
 
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