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These are the best TV series of this summer

So far, so so good.

It's August, already! The summer is nearly over, so why not pay tribute to some of this year's best television? Here we have the five best series of the summer. And if you haven't watched already, you're missing out.  

"Insecure"

This season of “Insecure” is an improvement on the first — which was already delightfully funny. This year, the series is funnier and more raw, bringing a fresh take to Issa’s comings and goings, and exploring the little seen lives of other characters, including the very beautiful, very lost Lawrence (Jay Ellis). The sophomore season also manages to show new and old relationships as they truly are, featuring sex and sexuality in all of its sexy, and often awkward, glory.

"Game of Thrones"

There’s no time to waste — winter is here, and as a result? This season of “Game of Thrones” has done away with its famously slow pacing, trading it instead with chilling precision. That’s right: The last six seasons of building tension are paying off. Finally, we get to see far off characters interact with each other — Daenerys and Jon’s long waited for meeting; and Cersei’s final revenge on Ellaria come to mind. And with the final episode premiering in a few short weeks, there’s no telling what the future may hold.

"GLOW"

Alison Brie was clearly very stoked about her first leading role in Netflix’s “GLOW.” And that excitement translates into her infectious performance as Ruth, a struggling actress in 1980s Los Angeles. An enjoyable, discerning romp through the decade of big hair, “GLOW” manages to be funny and serious at the same time, tackling feminism, fidelity and determination in equal turns. Oh, and there’s the whole thing where a group of misfit women come together to learn the glorious art of wrestling. A must watch.

"The Bachelorette"

Hear us out: We didn’t have high expectations for the 13th season of “The Bachelorette,” first black bachelorette notwithstanding. And even though there were obvious racial machinations behind the scenes — just look at the very obvious very strung out feud between Kenny and Lee — Rachel Lindsay’s season is the closest the franchise has ever gotten to being self-aware.

Somehow, Lindsay’s season has been an subtly eye opening foray into interracial dating, and the struggles of personhood when dating while black. Many of the bachelors admit to never having dated a black woman, and Lindsay admitted before the premiere that race didn’t play a factor into the decision she made. At time time we were skeptical. But witnessing her journey, and seeing Lindsay struggle with the loaded expectations piled on her has been a fascinating ride. 

"The Handmaid’s Tale"

What summer television round up in its right mind would dismiss the genius of “The Handmaid’s Tale”? Putting Margaret Atwood’s dystopian thriller in modern times is both a necessary and awfully terrifying effort — oftentimes, “The Handmaid’s Tale” hits too close to home. And with stellar performances from Elisabeth Moss, Samira Wiley and Alexis Bledel, the series is as powerful as it is disturbing. Bonus points for having the Internet’s newest boyfriend, Max Minghella, starring as the dreamy, inscrutable Nick.