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Your guide to the best TV of winter 2017

It’s too cold to go out, why not enjoy some TV instead?

Lena Dunham films the final season of "Girls."

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A new year always brings along a new crop of binge-worthy shows to go with it. Here’s what we’ll be watching in the chilly first few months of 2017.

“Sherlock”

Fans of the fictional detective will be celebrating the new year by tuning into to PBS for “The Six Thatchers,” the first of three new episodes of the beloved series. Director Steven Moffat kicks off Season 4 with Sherlock (Benedict Cumberbatch) in modern day Britain once again as Dr. Watson (Martin Freeman) and his wife Mary (Amanda Abbington) begin getting ready for the rollercoaster ride that is parenthood.

PBS, Sunday, Jan. 1, 9 p.m.

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“One Day at a Time”

This new Netflix reboot of the classic 1970s sitcom centers around a Cuban-American family headed by Penelope, a divorced army mom played by Justina Machado, who is trying to jump back into the dating world while also raising two teens. Oscar winner Rita Moreno costars as a no-nonsense grandmother who keeps the family in check.

Netflix, Friday, Jan. 6

“The Young Pope”

Imagine if the Roman Catholic Church was lead by a priest who is not only American, but is as spectacularly handsome as Jude Law? That’s what “The Young Pope” gives you. While some viewers might be expecting a drama about a liberal, “cool” pope worthy of internet memes, Law’s Pius XIII turns out to be such a hardline conservative that even the cardinals who chose him are shocked. Needless to say, Pope Francis he is not.

HBO, Sunday, Jan. 15, 9 p.m.

“Riverdale”

We have to admit that the word "murder" isn’t what comes to mind when we think of the Riverdale of the iconic Archie’s Comics. But murder, intrigue and suspicion are all big parts of the CW’s gritty new show “Riverdale,” which follows Archie Andrews and his friends as they try to regroup after the most popular boy in school is found murdered. Cole Sprouse of “The Suite Life of Zack and Cody” fame plays Archie’s best friend Jughead and is part of a cast filled with teen drama staples.

CW, Thursday, Jan. 26, 9 p.m.

“Z: The Beginning of Everything”

If Zelda Fitzgerald were alive today, she would outshine any reality star in terms of beauty, brains and outrageous behavior. Christina Ricci portrays the future wife of F. Scott Fitzgerald from the moment the Southern belle meets the young Princeton writer to their rise as the unofficial king and queen of the Jazz Age literary scene.

Amazon, Friday, Jan. 27

“Taboo”

A new historical drama starring Tom Hardy that’s set in London in 1814? Sign us up! Hardy’s James Keziah Delaney stuns high society England when he returns from Africa after being presumed dead. As Delaney prepares to take over his father’s shipping empire a long line of enemies emerge to threaten both him and his family fortune.

FX, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 10 p.m.

“Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events”

Neil Patrick Harris plays the scheming Count Olaf in this new Netflix series based on the beloved children’s books. The show follows orphans Violet, Klaus and Sunny Baudelaire as they try to solve the mystery behind their parents’ deaths while also working to save their inheritance from their uncle Olaf’s machinations.

Netflix, Friday, Jan. 13

“Victoria”

Costume drama fans that are still mourning “Downton Abbey” rejoice: the new "Masterpiece" series “Victoria” is here to take its place. Viewers first meet the newly crowned teenage monarch when she is suddenly swept into power after a childhood filled with neglect and trauma. Over the show’s eight episodes, we see Victoria and the future Prince Albert (Tom Hughes) begin the courtship which leads to their famously loving marriage.

PBS, Sunday, Jan. 15, 9 p.m.

“Girls”

It’s hard to imagine that it’s been nearly six years since we were first introduced to Hannah Horvath, the anxious and immature aspiring writer played by Lena Dunham. Since then, viewers have watched Hannah and the other girls navigate love and ambition in a very hipster Brooklyn way. Dunham said earlier this year that it was time to end the show because she “wanted to make sure we kept the momentum alive.” Hopefully fans will feel the show ends on a high note when things wrap up this spring.

HBO, Sunday, Feb. 12 at 10 p.m.

“Crashing”

Fans of comic Pete Holmes’ stand-up know that he often talks about the impact of his divorce in his act. In this new based-on-a-true-story sitcom produced by Judd Apatow, Holmes plays a struggling comic determined to pick up the pieces after his wife leaves him for a sexy Italian boxer.

HBO, Sunday, Feb. 19, 10:30 p.m.

 
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