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5 styling hacks for your house plants

Interior plant designer Lisa Muñoz shares her tips.

Forget Scandinavian design — when it comes to décor, these days plants are all the rage. But you can’t just go buy any ol’ plant and plop it down in its flimsy plastic container and expect it to transform your place.

There’s way more thought put into those gorgeous bohemian dens or chic minimalist lofts you stalk on Pinterest. The plants in those homes have probably been curated by an expert, which is why we hit up Brooklyn-based plant designer Lisa Muñoz of LeafandJune.com. The certified horticulturist and self-proclaimed “plant lady” shares some of her best styling tips.

“Corners are great for a splash of green.” Muñoz recommends creating a grouping and experimenting with various heights of plants and planters. In this group, she used a birds nest fern (“which unlike a lot of ferns likes bright light”) and a fiddle leaf fig. “It’s a really nice statement piece,” she says. Muñoz also placed a watermelon peperomia on a vintage stool. She loves scouring flea markets for old items to use as stands.

Can’t find decent flowers at your local bogeda?Try philodendron leaves. “It’s a nice way of adding an accent without having a potted plant or cut flowers that only last a few days,” says Muñoz . She says these should last about 7-10 days.

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"Trailing plants work really well on a shelf.It creates such a nice waterfall effect and you take advantage of the height of the shelves,” says Muñoz . She used a pothos plant in this brownstone bathroom. Another takeaway: Some plants — like humidity-loving ferns — work especially well in a bathroom.

Don’t let your lack of surface space stop you from peppering your home with houseplants.Muñoz says some plants work well with bright light and heat and can be placed right on top of a radiator. In this room she used an aloe plant, a pencil cactus and a dracaena reflexa. The trick: “Any plant I put on a radiator, I put a little cork plate underneath,” she says, adding, “in the winter you just want to check the soil a little more frequently to make sure it’s not super dry.”

 
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