Eliza Doolittle's all grown up

Eliza Doolittle explains why her soulful sound, like her style, has taken a darker turn.

MOD_W42_Eliza Doolittle

 

Eliza Doolittle’s track “Big When I Was Little” would have you believe that the diminutive singer skips her way through the streets of planet positive. It’s almost gratingly peppy and bright. But today, Doolittle — real name Eliza Sophie Caird — has cast off the Crayola colors and denim cutoffs in favor of something akin to a Nirvana-listening grunge groupie. She’s wearing ripped jeans slung low below her hips, revealing a familiar flash of flesh, with a non-descript dark top and scuffed Pumas. The 25-year-old Londoner tells us about her sophomore album “In Your Hands” (out now), post-breakup blues and why her look makes her feel liberated.

 

 

You’re a big fan of small clothes and flashing a little bit of skin. Do you shrink your clothes or shop in the kid’s section?

 

[Laughs] I have a cashmere jumper that I shrank in the wash and yeah, sometimes I like that kind of kid’s T-shirt look.

You were at the Henry Holland show. What do you like about him?

Henry’s more than a designer, he’s an inventor. He was the first one to do the bandana print that’s gone crazy.


Normally you’re in bright colors. Do you ever just want to be inconspicuous and wear black?

I actually haven’t been wearing as many colors as I used to. I’m the kind of person that gets obsessed with one thing until I get bored and then I move on. Right now, I’m loving baggy jeans with rips.


When did you decide to start flashing a bit of flesh?

It wasn’t a decision and I don’t really think I flash that much. My rule is no nipples, no nunny.

Well that kind of kills my next question, but are you ever worried about being branded slutty?

No, I think I’m more of a free spirit. If I cover up too much it doesn’t feel right.


Is it kind of liberating, like being naked?

Yeah, it’s liberating and itreally is just a comfort thing for me — I don’t think I’m overtly sexual in the way I dress. If I were covering up all the time, it wouldn’t express who I am.


While we’re speaking of expression, is making music a cathartic experience for you?

Music is the only thing that is going to be there for me no matter what. So when I finish a song, I play it out loud — it’s the best thing I’ve ever felt. Better than love, I think. ... Sometimes I can tell when I’m writing catchy melodies and I’m proud of it. Although, if there were an actual formula for it, I’d be f—ing loaded by now.

 
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