Chef Izzy Eidelman owns Izzy's Brooklyn Smokehouse, a kosher BBQ joint in Crown Heights that's just one of Brooklyn's barbecue gems. Credit: Getty Images

Chef Izzy Eidelman owns Izzy's Brooklyn Smokehouse, a kosher BBQ joint in Crown Heights that's just one of Brooklyn's barbecue gems. Credit: Getty Images

America has given the world many great things, and when it comes to food there’s been no greater gift than barbecue — or BBQ if your fingers are covered in sauce and you want to get fewer keys messy.

With heritage comes pride, and the residents of acclaimed barbecue states like Texas, North Carolina and Kansas were quick to light a fire under Vice’s food section Munchies when it asked, “Why is Brooklyn BBQ taking over the world?”

But as with most fights about news stories on the internet, the commenters didn’t read it. Their issue was not with the story's thoughtful exploration of what New York City is doing with barbecue that hasn’t been done before at restaurants like the deservedly iconic Fette Sau, beloved Hometown Bar-B-Que and the first-ever vegan barbecue joint. 

 

It was the sad-looking photo that was meant to prove this so-called barbecue superiority. 

And while Southerners are famous for their hospitality, the gloves come off when the honor of barbecue is at stake:

Like Gordon Ramsay critiquing weeknight dinners on his Instagram, barbecue fans had plenty to say about the food without having tasted it:

But the fight wasn’t all mean-spirited. The thread proved to be an amazing list of recommendations for barbecue joints serving more, shall we say, authentic plates.

And if you can’t afford a barbecue road trip, there’s always summer’s Big Apple Barbecue in Madison Square Park.

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