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Going open house hopping

<p>Throwing a good open house takes a certain amount of finesse. How perfectly everything is staged and executed is what potentially makes a sale. Last week, SoHo’s chic and glassy 350 W. Broadway — a decadent full-floor model residence designed by architect William T. Georges — was unveiled for the open house hopping set. A party hosted by developer Aby Rosen followed. Ducks were aligned: The aroma of Jo Malone candles wafted just enough for people to comment aloud about how good the three-bedroom, 41/2-bathroom, fully furnished pad smelled — the very least that can be expected for $9.85 million. There was requisite easy listening music playing from the built-into-the-wall high-tech gadgetry. And of course those good-looking actor types working as waiters, never allowing for an empty champagne glass, while carrying trays of canapes (meatballs and mini spinach raviolis at this party) for the hungry and freeloading.</p>

Throwing a good open house takes a certain amount of finesse. How perfectly everything is staged and executed is what potentially makes a sale. Last week, SoHo’s chic and glassy 350 W. Broadway — a decadent full-floor model residence designed by architect William T. Georges — was unveiled for the open house hopping set. A party hosted by developer Aby Rosen followed. Ducks were aligned: The aroma of Jo Malone candles wafted just enough for people to comment aloud about how good the three-bedroom, 41/2-bathroom, fully furnished pad smelled — the very least that can be expected for $9.85 million. There was requisite easy listening music playing from the built-into-the-wall high-tech gadgetry. And of course those good-looking actor types working as waiters, never allowing for an empty champagne glass, while carrying trays of canapes (meatballs and mini spinach raviolis at this party) for the hungry and freeloading.


There was one error of note. The party was scheduled to begin at 5:30 p.m. so guests could really take in the sweeping views before sunset. But no one in N.Y. shows up to parties on time, so until 7 p.m. the open house was a fairly empty house.


However for those of us savvy enough to be punctual, this meant more food, more champagne, and plenty of space to lounge on the red velvet sofa while paging through the fantastic collection of art books.


– Shira Levine is a freelance writer living in New York City.


Metro does not endorse the opinions of the author, or any opinions expressed on its pages.

 
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