(Courtesy of the National Wildlife Federation) (Courtesy of the National Wildlife Federation)

Visiting day at camp is a day full of emotions: parents are excited to see campers after a seemingly long absence, and campers may be ready to leave camp behind completely or, hopefully, show off new skills and crafts.

To make sure your family's visiting day is free of hiccups, theAmerican Camp Association provided these tips for having a successful visiting day:

Do arrive on time.

 

Do read your camp’s policies on bringing outside food to camp. Some camps have campers with severe food allergies and don’t allow outside food on camp grounds.

Do limit the amount of food you bring to camp on visiting day if your camp allows it. Many camps will only allow your child to keep the food until the end of the day or only one day after visiting day so excess food is wasteful.

Do follow the camp’s policy on bunk gifts. If your camp doesn’t allow them, respect the rule.

Do be a good sport and participate in activities that the camp has planned for the day.

Don’t take your child off camp grounds if the policy is to stay at camp.

Don’t tell your child about all the things they are missing at home while they are at camp. This can make a child feel homesick after you leave.

Don’t bring banned items which can include cell phones, iPads and cameras that record video.

Don’t make pick-up deals with your child. Put the camp time frame in perspective for your child if you sense he or she is missing home. Let them know you are confident that staying at camp will be a great experience.

Don’t bring numerous people to camp. The purpose of visiting day is to spend time with your child and to see your child in the camp environment.

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