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Learn the art of ‘No’ while keeping your reputation Golden

A typical career question I get is from recent college grads whoare at the bottom of the totem pole. Often, they have two or moresenior colleagues who delegate work to them. Unfortunately, theresimply aren’t enough hours in the day to do everything, and they findthat they’re either saying no to someone all the time, or they’reworking until they drop.<br />

A typical career question I get is from recent college grads who are at the bottom of the totem pole. Often, they have two or more senior colleagues who delegate work to them. Unfortunately, there simply aren’t enough hours in the day to do everything, and they find that they’re either saying no to someone all the time, or they’re working until they drop.

This is a tough situation because you want to be perceived as a can-do, enthusiastic employee and should therefore try to avoid actually uttering the word “no” to anyone you work with. However, you have to be mindful of your own stress level and sanity, too.

I recommend trying to preempt situations in which you will have to decline an assignment, specifically by formalizing your daily responsibilities with your official boss. Talk to your boss about who on the team is authorized to delegate work to you, and note the type of assignments you can expect from each person.

If one of your managers comes to you with an assignment but your time is already accounted for, tell that manager that you wish you could help, but you are working on another project that requires your attention. Either you can go to your boss directly and ask him or her which task you should prioritize, or you can give the manager the option of speaking to your boss about it.

Remember to stress how much you enjoy working with this manager, because you want him or her to leave with the perception that you really do want to do the task and can’t help being caught between conflicting responsibilities. In a nutshell: Get your boss to say “no” for you, and keep yourself looking good to everyone!

– Alexandra Levit is the author of “New Job, New You:?A Guide to Reinventing Yourself in a Bright New Career.”

Visit www.newjobnewyou.com for free career change guidance and resources.

Metro does not endorse the opinions of the author, or any opinions expressed on its pages. Opposing viewpoints are welcome. Send 400-word submissions to letters@metro.us.

 
 
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