Stay healthy on the path to career success

Companies don't want to waste their precious budgets on health care costs, so keep fit for your sake (and theirs.)

run work Staying fit trims the fat around employees' waistlines and the company budget. / Getty Images

 

Employee wellness is a major trend that companies are focusing on right now because it affects the bottom line. For instance, about 11% of the workforce suffers from depression and as a result, they miss nearly nine days per year. This costs companies $23 billion each year, according to the Wall Street Journal. That's why companies are increasingly investing in standing desks and fitness programs.

 

It's known that professionals who are healthier are happier, more productive and more loyal to their companies. Recently, Pew Research reported that 45% of adults have at least one chronic condition, including high blood pressure and diabetes. By focusing on the following three habits, you can better control these conditions, live healthier and that will translate into a higher level of career success:

 

1. Eat better. A few months ago, I challenged myself to go gluten free, eliminate red meat and processed food. I was curious as to what affects it would have on my body and my health and it was profound. I've been able to digest food easier, sleep better and my energy level is higher. Before I started the diet, I would have to take naps throughout the day, I would get "food coma's" and it was harder to sleep. By eating better, you will feel better and be more productive and happy.

 

2. Sleep more. The National Sleep Foundation says that you should sleep approximately 8.5 hours per night. When I don't get enough sleep, I end up tired throughout the day and accomplish less. A lot of professionals go to bed really late and wake up early and it's impeding their success. Sleep more to perform better, period.

3. Exercise regularly. While many of you exercise for an hour each day, research in Tom Rath's book "Eat Move Sleep" shows that you need to active throughout the entire day instead. This can be difficult because many people drive to work (sitting), work in a cubicle in the office (sitting) and then go home and watch TV (sitting). A study by the University of Sydney shows that those who spend eleven or more hours a day sitting are 40% more likely to die over the next three years. I recommend that you take breaks during your workday so you can stay active.

Dan Schawbel is a Gen Y Career expert, the founder of Millennial Branding and author of the New York Times best-selling book, Promote Yourself: The New Rules For Career Success.

 
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