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The Word: Sarah Silverman has a proposition to make

Talk about a patriot: For a $100 million campaign contribution, she'll drop her pants.

Plenty of celebrities are hosting fundraising events for the Obama campaign, from Sarah Jessica Parker's swanky A-list party at her New York City apartment to Gwen Stefani's upcoming family picnic in Los Angeles. But only Sarah Silverman has offered sexual favors in exchange for campaign contributions.

In a short video titled "An Indecent Proposal," Silverman — in her trademark cereal-stained hoodie and last-night's ponytail — attempts to persuade billionaire casino magnate Sheldon Adelson to cancel his $100 million check to Mitt Romney.

"If you give that $100 million to Obama instead of Romney, I will — well, I won't have sex with you because we're not married and I'm a nice girl, but I will 'scissor' you wearing a bikini bottom through to fruition," she says. "You'll be the only elderly billionaire on the block to have traditional lesbian sex through to climax with a girl who had her own show on Comedy Central."

Like all Sarah Silverman skits, it's probably funny if you can keep your eyes open — but we're not risking it.

You don't say, Demi

Demi Moore's daughters still aren't speaking to her, but it seems they are in touch with her ex husband, Ashton Kutcher.

"The girls have all stayed friends with Ashton, and that is infuriating Demi," a source tells RadarOnline. "Ashton cheating on Demi humiliated her, and when she got out of the relationship she thought she was setting a good example for her daughters, so when they stayed close to Ashton it devastated her."

Demi, teenage girls will abandon you for premium cable and Pop-Tarts, let alone Ashton Kutcher's abs. Those things seriously look like chiseled sunshine. Date wisely next time, lady!

We also write about dogs sometimes ...

In a new interview with GQ, "Dark Knight Rises" star Joseph Gordon-Levitt admits that he was turning into a "hopeless ivory tower douchebag” and was once a "sort of a serious little dude — snobby."

Now, he has a better handle on fame, if not an appreciation of it.

"I really don't like this notion that some people are more important than other people," he says. "These stories about these elevated people called 'celebrities' teaches you that what you have to say doesn't matter. It's degrading."

Well now, Joseph, this is awkward, isn't it?

 
 
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