new york city budget agreement Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito and Mayor de Blasio announce New York City's budget agreement for fiscal year 2015.
Credit: William Alatriste for the New York City Council

 

Late last night, with a ceremonial handshake in City Hall's rotunda, Mayor Bill de Blasio and the City Council reached a deal on a roughly $75 billion budget.The Council is expected to formally vote on the budget next week.

 

Here are 10 things included in the budget plan -- plus what's missing.

 

1. $6.2 million for 200 police administrative aides


nypd The City Council asked for 1,000 more cops.
Credit: Getty

This would put more uniformed officers on the streets, according to officials.Still, City Council members, including Speaker Melissa Mark-Vivertio, had been pushing for an additional 1,000 officers. That would have cost about$94.3 million in the first year and $97.9 million in fiscal year 2016.

 

2. $6.25 million for free school lunches to public middle school students


school lunch Some politicians had been advocating for free lunch for all public school students.
Credit: Carol Guzy/The Washington Post/Getty Images

The money would fund a pilot program beginning this September. Public Advocate Letitia James, along with some other politicians, had been pushing for universal free lunch for all public school students, at a cost of $24 million.

 

3. $10 million to expands child care vouchers for low-income families


Officials said this would create thousands more vouchers.

4. $15.5 million more for park maintenance and security


Prospect park A woman runs through Brooklyn's Prospect Park on a morning with dense fog in January.
Credit: Getty Images

Councilman Mark Levine, chair of the parks committee, originally asked for $27.5 million. Advocates still hailed the boost, which includes $750,000 to go toward a neighborhood parks equity fund.

5. $17 million to keep NYCHA Community and Senior Centers open


The money would keep 57 NYCHA Community and Senior Centers open.

6. $32.5 million to go toward programs for inmates with mental illness at Rikers Island.


A view of buildings at the Rikers Island penitentiary complex, where a man was "baked to death" in a jail cell, according to an Associated Press report.  Credit: Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images A view of buildings at the Rikers Island penitentiary complex, where a man was "baked to death" in a jail cell, according to an Associated Press report.
Credit: Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images

This comes amid a reportedincrease in violence and mental at the complex. Earlier this year, an inmate in the mental observation unit was reportedly "baked to death."

7. $11.1 million for merit-based scholarships at CUNY


The City Council's Merit Based Scholarship program would provide scholarships to New York City High School graduates who maintain at least a B average at CUNY.

8. $10.3 million to expand legal services and english classes for immigrants


The City Council will provide the funds to expand the services, as well as allocate $1 million to support the CUNY Citizenship Now! Hotline.

9. $19 million for a plan to reduce violent crime in NYCHA developments


brooklyn east new york stabbing 6 year old Three-year-old J.J. Armstrong asks his mom Tanaeia to go play in the park the day after P.J. Avitto, 6, was killed and Mikayla Capers, 7, was critically injured after they were stabbed at the Boulevard Houses in East new York.
Credit: Miles Dixon/Metro

The money would go toward increasing community engagement efforts and expanding neighborhood watch and domestic violence outreach. The allocation follows the death of 6-year-0ld P.J. Avitto, who was stabbed at the Boulevard Houses Houses in East New York.

10. $17.5 million for summer youth jobs and summer camp


This would support 10,700 summer youth and create 22,000 slots for summer out-of-school programs.

Follow Anna Sanders on Twitter @AnnaESanders