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Alternative care nets potent pet treatments

When Margo McWeeney’s cocker spaniel named Gracie developed congenital bone and muscle issues several years ago, the East Boston resident spent 18 months and thousands of dollars on several surgeries. Then, within a couple months of alternative treatments such as acupuncture, Gracie lost excess weight and regained muscle.

When Margo McWeeney’s cocker spaniel named Gracie developed congenital bone and muscle issues several years ago, the East Boston resident spent 18 months and thousands of dollars on several surgeries.

Veterinarians suggested painkillers and limited physical activity, and some even suggested euthanizing the dog. “I said ‘That’s not an option, give me the painkillers, I’m out of here,’” McWeeney recalled.

Then, within a couple months of alternative treatments such as acupuncture, Gracie lost excess weight and regained muscle.

“She was a totally different dog, it was amazing,” McWeeney said of Gracie, who was killed by a car shortly after she got healthy. “When she died I said I need to tell people more about alternative treatment. I didn’t want her life to be in vain.”

McWeeney established Gracie’s Mission, a organization dedicated to providing information about alternative forms of care for ailing animals when traditional therapies don’t work.

The group, which provides financial assistance to those who can’t afford treatments, recently received nonprofit status and is accepting applications for financial assistance.

McWeeney’s current dog is undergoing acupuncture for stomach problems.


All the stops


Alternative care includes chiropractic treatments, quartz crystal therapy and color and music therapy.

 
 
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