Home
 
Choose Your City
Change City

Anthony Weiner tries to re-insert himself into NYC politics

C'mon! Sexting six different women from your Congressional office and then lying about it for weeks was so last year!

One of New York's most disgraced former politicians, Anthony Weiner, is flirting again. But this time it's with the idea of running for mayor.

Sources told the the New York Post today that the former Queens congressman is "seriously considering" running for mayor, with public advocate as his back-up elected position.

And perhaps even more surprisingly, some New Yorkers told Metro they would be open to voting for Weiner. Yes, really.

"We all have issues," said Manhattan resident Brian Jeuremov, 60. "I wouldn't discount him based on that. I'd like to see his platform, of course, but I think he deserves a second chance."

Jeuremov, a lifelong Democrat, said he'd be forced to vote for Weiner if he were the only Democratic candidate in the running.

"There's no way I'm voting for a Republican," he added.

The shamed former congressman has been laying low since he tweeted a picture of his crotch to a college student in May 2011. Weiner, who was married at the time and still is, admitted he sexted several women on Twitter. While still in office last year, Weiner insisted for weeks that his account had been hacked, but later confessed that the pictures were of him. He resigned in June.

And now he may be coming back, or at least, trying to. Since Weiner resigned, he's been a stay-at-home dad to son Jordan Zane and is still married to Hillary Clinton's aide, Huma Abedin.

"I'd consider it," said a Brooklyn lawyer who didn't want to be named, when asked if he would vote for Weiner. "I mean if I was going to vote for him in the first place [what he did] wouldn't stop me from voting for him this time around."

Would you vote for Weiner?

"Absolutely not. If he's in public office, and we're paying for that? Oh no."

Kerry Riordan, 50, Manhattan, entrepreneur

"I think [he] is a smart and capable person, but an apparent lack of judgement disqualifies him from office."

Basil Safos, 53, Queens, business-owner

"Sure. We all have issues. I wouldn't discount him based on that."

Brian Jeremov, 60, Manhattan, showroom owner

"Definitely not. You can't really trust him. Background is important; it says a lot about a person."

Bisma Khan, 21, Manhattan, Medical School student

 
 
Consider AlsoFurther Articles