The Be Bold Road Trip stopped in Boston Wednesday for a rally in an effort to build support for abortion coverage. Photo: Nicolaus Czarnecki/Metro The Be Bold Road Trip stopped in Boston Wednesday for a rally in an effort to build support for abortion coverage. Photo: Nicolaus Czarnecki/Metro

 

Pro-choice activists concerned over women's rights to safe reproductive health pulled into Copley Square Wednesday as part of a national bus tour calling for a lift of bans that deny abortion coverage for low-income women.

 

Since kicking off the 10,000-mile Be Bold Road Trip in Los Angeles, C.A. on Aug. 9 the tour has hit up Portland, O.R., Minneapolis, M.N, and Chicago, I.L., before parking Boston.

 

The bus served as a centerpiece for a rally featuring Boston City Councilor Ayanna Pressley. Visitors snapped photos at a "selfie station," wrote messages on the side of the bus and heard abortion stories from local women.

 

"It's been really successful in terms of people just walking by and engaging with us," said Harvard student Brianna Suslovic, 19, who volunteered at the event. "It's also been a really great opportunity to educate people on things they may not know about restrictions on abortion access and access to abortion care."

 

The tour arrived in Boston just months after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the state’s 7-year-old law that created a 35-foot buffer zone outside abortion clinics in Massachusetts on the grounds that it violated protestor’s right to free speech.

Notes were written on the side of the bus. Photo: Morgan Rousseau/Metro Notes were written on the side of the bus. Photo: Morgan Rousseau/Metro

Britni de la Cretaz, a director of Hollaback! Boston, helped organize demonstrations following the ruling. She stopped by the truck on Wednesday to show her support.

"I think reproductive justice organizing in Massachusetts has kind of taken a back seat for a while. I think we thought we had this licked because we’re such a progressive state. I think it’s taken people by surprise, and it’s almost like a new movement again. So it’s nice to see people coming out and showing their support," saidde la Cretaz.

Nearby, Boston resident Nate Richardson wore an eye patch as he posed for a selfie in front of the bus.

"Just doing stuff like taking a selfie; it doesn't really do much, but at the same time it shows all the different faces of what the issue looks like," said Richardson, 23. It's not just women. It can affect anyone."

The tour lands in New Haven, C.T. today and is slated to end later this month in Washington, D.C.

Follow Morgan Rousseau on Twitter: @MetroMorgan
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