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Bill de Blasio surges further ahead in latest poll of Democratic primary voters

Public Advocate Bill de Blasio is surging further ahead among likely voters in the latest poll on the Democratic mayoral primary.

Credit: Bess Adler Credit: Bess Adler

Public Advocate Bill de Blasio is surging further ahead among likely voters in the latest poll on the Democratic mayoral primary.

Of 602 likely Democratic primary voters, de Blasio has 36 percent of the vote, just shy of the 40 percent need to avoid a runoff election and clinch the nomination, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released Wednesday.

"The political cliche, that the most liberal candidate wins the Democratic primary in New York, seems to be alive and well," said Quinnipiac University Polling Institute director Maurice Carroll in a statement. "New ideas, like his tax-the-rich proposal, win big for de Blasio."

City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, who has been a frontrunner in the race from the beginning, has 21 percent of the vote and is in a statistical dead-heat with former City Comptroller Bill Thompson, who has 20 percent of the vote.

Former Congressman Anthony Weiner has just eight percent of the vote, followed by current-City Comptroller John Liu.

Recent  Quinnipiac University Polling Institute survey results. Credit:  Quinnipiac University Polling Institute Recent Quinnipiac University Polling Institute survey results.
Credit: Quinnipiac University Polling Institute

In a comparable Quinnipiac poll two weeks ago, de Blasio had 30 percent of the vote.

He would beat both Quinn and Thompson in runoff election scenarios, the new poll suggests. Thompson would beat Quinn in a runoff.

Of those polled, 65 percent said the city needs to take a different direction from Mayor Michael Bloomberg. These sentiments may have helped boost de Blasio, who has tried to paint himself as the "anti-Bloomberg."

"Voters seem to be getting bored with Mayor Michael Bloomberg," Carroll added.

Nearly a third of voters said there was a "good chance" they would change their minds before the Sept. 10 primary.

The poll, which was conducted between Aug. 22 and 27, has a margin of error plus or minus four percentage points.

Follow Anna Sanders on Twitter: @AnnaESanders

 
 
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