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Bloomberg, in speech on resiliency, declares 'post-9/11 uncertainty is over'

In a stirring speech at 7 World Trade Center, Mayor Michael Bloomberg spoke about the city's resiliency, declaring, "post-9/11 uncertainty is over."

Mayor Michael Bloomberg delivers speech on New York City’s post-9/11 recovery and renewal. Credit: Edward Reed/Mayor's Office Mayor Michael Bloomberg delivers speech on New York City’s post-9/11 recovery and renewal.
Credit: Edward Reed/Mayor's Office

In a stirring speech at 7 World Trade Center, Mayor Michael Bloomberg spoke about the recovery and resiliency of the city, declaring, "post-9/11 uncertainty is over."

Speaking at an event hosted by the Downtown Alliance, Bloomberg pointed to the city's progress in rebuilding the sense of normalcy after the attacks 12 years ago.

Since his first day in office—when he visited the World Trade Center site to thank recovery workers—Bloomberg said the city has "succeeded beyond what anyone thought was possible" in achieving that normalcy.

"The overwhelming sense of anxiety that once filled the air here in Lower Manhattan—and all across the city—has been replaced by a sense of energy and renewal," Bloomberg said.

He noted the new schools, buildings, parks and everyday worries returning are proof of this renewal.

Bloomberg also highlighted the growth in tourism since 2000 and the city's decline in crime, to some 400 murders a year.

He said that the city must continue to be resilient and not take the safety and security post-9/11 for granted.

"Of course, our job is not only to avoid the mistakes of the past–but to anticipate the changes of the future," he said, pointing to Hurricane Sandy's detrimental affect on communities in Lower Manhattan and other neighborhoods.

"Whether it is extreme weather, or terrorism, or crime, or a national recession, we can never forget the lessons that we have learned," he said. "The future is not preordained. It is ours to shape and to strengthen as best we can."

In three and a half months, it will be up to a new administration to continue this progress, Bloomberg concluded.

Follow Anna Sanders on Twitter: @AnnaESanders

 
 
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