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Boston public schools open an hour early, buses operate as scheduled

Lawmakers in Massachusetts are hoping to raise the minimum high school dropout age from 16 to 18. Credit: Wiki commons. Boston Public Schools opened an hour early on Monday in case there was any fallout from the firing of two drivers involved in the Oct. 8 strike. Credit: WikiCommons

All Boston public schools opened an hour early Monday morning to ensure that parents had enough time to get their children to the classroom.

Despite fears that there may be further action taken by angry bus drivers, who went on strike on Oct. 8, everything seemed to run smoothly Monday morning. Schools opened their doors at 6:15 am.


BPS spokesman Brian Ballou previously said in a statement that while there was no reason to believe there would be any further striking today, they wanted to be prepared.

“We have no specific reason to believe there’s going to be any action (today),” Ballou said, according to the Boston Herald. “Just given some of the recent events that have happened, we feel the need to open schools early. This isn’t a reaction to any one thing that has happened, it’s a result of what’s been going on since Oct. 8 and before that.”

The drivers went on strike due to their frustration with Veolia Transportation.

“Veolia’s relationship with the bus drivers as a whole is probably stronger now than it was then. They’ve been sitting down and having really constructive talks,” said Ballou.

Veolia fired two employees after the Oct. 8 strike, causing many to assume there would be a backlash.

“Working parents deserve to be able to make a contingency plan,” Ballou said. “We’re continuing to look at the situation and will continue to evaluate it. If there’s any sort of action going on or an attempt to prevent bus drivers from doing their jobs, then we’ll alert them as early as possible.”

Follow Metro Boston on Twitter: @MetroBOS

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