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Brooklyn man indicted for allegedly training dogs to fight

A Brooklyn man was indicted for today for training dogs to fight.

The defendant allegedly had seven pit bulls he intended to use in dogfights. Credit: ASPCA/Metro File Photo The defendant allegedly had seven pit bulls he intended to use in dogfights. Credit: ASPCA

Brooklyn District Attorney Charles Hynes announced on Monday the indictment of a man accused of training pit bulls to fight.

Leslie Alexander, 39, of Brooklyn faces more than two dozen charges in connection with dogfighting.

Hynes slammed animal fighting as "a barbaric and inhumane practice."

"Animal fighting is not a 'sport,'" he said.

Hynes noted that breeding and training animals for fighting is a felony under New York state law and can bring a sentence of up to four years in prison and a $25,000 fine. Many activities connected to animal fighting are felonies under federal law as well.

NYPD officers were granted a warrant to search Alexander's home for guns and drugs, but when they executed the search on May 24, they reportedly found seven pit bulls and equipment used to train dogs for dogfighting, including 25 dog kennels, devices to strengthen the dogs' jaws, syringes, two dog treadmills and a "breaking stick" to be used to break a dog's grip on an animal or other object.

Additionally, Alexander's garage had allegedly been converted to a dogfighting arena.

Hynes said a handgun and multiple boxes of ammunition were also found at the house.

Animal Care and Control officers impounded the dogs, which Hynes said appeared malnourished and had scars and signs of recent trauma that appeared to have come from dogfighting.

Alexander is being charged with 22 counts of animal fighting; seven counts of overdriving, torturing and injuring animals; criminal possession of a weapon in the second degree; criminal possession of a weapon in the fourth degree; and unlawful possession of ammunition.

If convicted, he could face up to seven years in prison. His arraignment is set for June 2.

Hynes urged people who hear of any plans for dogfights or anything that sounds like dogfighting, or see animals who appear wounded as a result of fighting, to call his office, Animal Care and Control or the ASPCA.

Follow Danielle Tcholakian on Twitter @danielleiat

 
 
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