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Christine Quinn returns to City Council after mayoral primary defeat

With resigned tranquility, City Council Speaker Christine Quinn returned to work Thursday after a crushing defeat in the mayoral election.

City Council Speaker Christine Quinn discusses two pieces of legislation after losing the Democratic mayoral primary. Credit: William Alatriste City Council Speaker Christine Quinn discusses two pieces of legislation after losing the Democratic mayoral primary.
Credit: William Alatriste

With resigned tranquility, City Council Speaker Christine Quinn got back to work Thursday after a crushing defeat in the mayoral election.

Quinn received just 15.5 percent of the vote in the Democratic primary Tuesday, with 99 percent of precincts reporting.

As her reign over the council ends, Quinn said New Yorkers can expect a "ton of legislation" to pass between now and Dec. 31. Party and election politics, she added, will end on the steps of City Hall during her last months in office.

"That's what makes this institution one of the best examples of legislative democracy anywhere in the country," Quinn said.

Legislative priorities will be organized with other members, but that work has yet to be done.

"You can imagine I wasn't doing a ton of that yesterday," Quinn said with a nervous chuckle.

Before making the remarks, Quinn and several other council members discussed two pieces of legislation. One bill would require sanitation officials to conduct a pilot study on compost, while two others would make the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner more accountable and transparent.

Off-topic, Quinn said there was "plenty of time for postmortems" on the election later.

"There's a lot of government work to do from here to the 31st," she said.

In a passionate appeal, Quinn further said that any suggestions that New York City wasn't ready for a woman to run City Hall were untrue.

"There will be an amazing day where history gets made in this city and it will raise all of us higher," she said. "It hasn't happened yet, but we are a city that is not only capable of anything, we'll eventually accomplish everything."

Those statements echoed Quinn's concession speech Tuesday night, when she said she was "obviously disappointed" with the results but still optimistic.

"All of you guys couldn’t make me more optimistic about the future of the city," Quinn told supporters with tears in her eyes.

Back at work — for now — Quinn said she wasn't sure what her next steps would be.

"There'll be another chapter, but I haven't started to write it yet," Quinn said simply.

Follow Anna Sanders on Twitter: @AnnaESanders

 
 
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