New York City hospitals are apparently expected an influx of babies this summer conceived during Hurricane Sandy. Credit: Metro File Photo. New York City hospitals are apparently expected an influx of babies this summer conceived during Hurricane Sandy. Credit: Metro File Photo.

New Yorkers will be seeing some new babies nine months after Hurricane Sandy left many in the tri-state area cooped up inside and without power, the New York Times reported this weekend.

One expectant mother, Meaghan Murphy, apparently explained to the Times that "with no power, no TV, no lights, even without that much food, there was no much else to do."

Murphy apparently added that her husband, Patrick, "is so handsome."

 

"I couldn't resist," she told the Times.

The Times credited "inoperable" elevators and "deluged" lobbies for the impending baby boom.

The Times cited a sociological study in rural India that reportedly found that with increased access to electricity, birth rates dropped, but notes that "no statistically sound effect on births was found after the 1965 power failure in the Northeast," and that there was actually a drop in birth rate from the year before nine months after the 2003 black out. The Journal of Population Economics reportedly found an uptick in births after minor storms, but the opposite following bigger storms like Sandy.

However, local hospitals are reportedly readying for an increase in births mid-summer, which would be approximately nine months after Sandy.

Birth rates in New York apparently typically peak in July, but the director of the division of gynecology at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Jacques Moritz, reportedly told the Times they expect an increase of 10 to 20 percent at the end of July as compared to last year.

New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center chief of obstetrics Amos Drunebaum reportedly said his hospital expects an even greater increase from the year before, estimating 20 to 30 percent.

A patient of Grunebaum's who was having trouble conceiving a second child is now pregnant, after having sex three times in one day during the storm, she told the Times.

Follow Danielle Tcholakian on Twitter @danielleiat

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