Home
 
Choose Your City
Change City

Eliot Spitzer spent $3.6 million on own City Comptroller campaign

Former governor and City Comptroller candidate Eliot Spitzer has spent $3.65 million on his own campaign.

Eliot Spitzer greeted voters in Union Square the day after announcing his candidacy for City Comptroller.  Credit: Bess Adler/Metro Eliot Spitzer greeted voters in Union Square the day after announcing his candidacy for City Comptroller.
Credit: Bess Adler/Metro

Former governor and City Comptroller candidate Eliot Spitzer has spent $3.65 million on his own campaign, according to campaign finance disclosures released Saturday.

Spitzer, who launched a comeback bid July 7 more than five years after resigning amid a prostitution scandal, spent $2.6 million in the last month alone.

More than $271,000 of Spitzer's cash went toward paying petitioners to get enough signatures to put him on the ballot. In four days, 27,000 signatures were collected.

Financial disclosures show Spitzer has also already spent over $2 million on television ads.

Spitzer's main competition in the Democratic primary, Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer, raised $308,000 in the same time period, from July 12 to Aug. 5. Stringer still has $4.47 million to spend on the campaign.

While Stringer is participating in the Campaign Finance Board's fund-matching program, Spitzer is not. His campaign spokesman said Spitzer "needed to" run an independent campaign.

"Unlike Mr. Stringer, Eliot is not a career politician with the power and money of the political and financial establishment propping up his campaign," Hari Sevugan said in a statement.

Stringer's spokeswoman said Spitzer spent more money per day getting his name on than what the average voter makes in a year. (The average annual salary for New Yorkers is between $40,000 and $128,000, depending on the borough. Divided evenly over 27 days, Spitzer spent some $91,000 per day.)

"The old Eliot supported eradicating big money from politics, but quickly abandoned these principles when they were no longer convenient for him," Stringer spokeswoman Audrey Gelman said in statement.

Though Stringer is still behind Spitzer in the latest polls, in snap survey after the pair debated Friday, 58 percent of New York Daily News readers said they believed Stringer won.

Follow Anna Sanders on Twitter: @AnnaESanders

 
 
Consider AlsoFurther Articles