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First multi-family buildings receive federal Sandy aid through Build it Back

Three large, multi-family properties became the first since Superstorm Sandy to receive federal aid through the city's Build it Back program Wednesday.

Credit: jovialkaleidoscopes via Flickr Three large, multi-family properties, including Knickerbocker Village on the Lower East Side, became the first since Superstorm Sandy to receive federal aid through the city's Build it Back program Wednesday.
Credit: jovialkaleidoscopes via Flickr

Three large, multi-family properties became the first since Superstorm Sandy to receive federal aid through the city's Build it Back program Wednesday.

"The more than $2.5 million in assistance for these properties will help more than one thousand families get back on their feet by supporting repairs in their buildings and ensuring these locations are built resiliently to protect against future storms," Mayor Michael Bloomberg said in a statement.

Since Congress passed $60.2 billion in relief funds for states affected by the storm in January, the city has received two installments of aid totaling $3.1 billion.

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The city will spend the money on housing recovery and repairs, aid for businesses and resiliency and infrastructure projects.

Earlier this month, a Staten Island woman became the first beneficiary of Build it Back, which doles out housing recovery funds. Until Wednesday, she was the only recipient.

City officials have defended the slow roll-out, saying the apparent delays were necessary.

"We are not wasting the taxpayers' money," Bloomberg said Monday. "We've tried to account for every single penny."

Knickerbocker Village, a State-supervised affordable housing development on the Lower East Side, received $1.46 million in relief funds to repair 12 elevator banks.

Two buildings in the Rockaways also received a combined $1.1 million for resiliency work.

One building, on Rockaway Beach Boulevard, will use the funds in part to install a permanent emergency generator and wall-mounted boilers. A building on Beach 54th Street will use a portion of the aid to install an emergency generator on the roof.

Follow Anna Sanders on Twitter: @AnnaESanders

 
 
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