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Future becomes focus for city officials on Sandy anniversary

New York City officials spent the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy's landfall touring resiliency projects.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg and other city officials tour bulkhead repairs along Beach Channel Drive in the Rockaways, which began before Sandy. After the storm, repairs now include a tidal gate. Credit: Ed Reed/Office of the Mayor Mayor Michael Bloomberg and other city officials tour the site of bulkhead repairs along Beach Channel Drive in the Rockaways, which began before Sandy. After the storm, repairs now include a tidal gate.
Credit: Ed Reed/Office of the Mayor

The tide swelled and tensed, eventually flooding Crescent Beach and destroying parts of the surrounding neighborhood on Staten Island's eastern shore as Superstorm Sandy made landfall.

A year later, Mayor Michael Bloomberg trudged through sand Tuesday while touring a dune fortification project on the beach meant to protect against such storm surges.

The city's Parks Department is building a 10-foot-tall, 2,000-foot-long berm on the beach using some 15,000 tons of sand, eventually reinforcing the natural barrier with dune grass.

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The berm is part of 59 resiliency milestones the city will finish before Bloomberg leaves office in January. Officials said the city completed 73 percent of those short-term milestones, just a fraction of the 257 climate change resiliency initiatives proposed in June.

During the three-borough tour,officials discussed details of resiliency projects meant to help protect the city against climate change.

Over 1.2 million cubic yards of sand on have been placed on beaches in the last year as part of dune fortification projects like the one on Crescent Beach.

The city began repairing a bulkhead along Beach Channel Drive in the Rockaways before Sandy, but their plans now include a tidal gate.

Officials also proposed installing a barrier and levee, near Coney Island Creek.

"If another storm like Sandy ever approaches our shores, it will find a far different city from the one that Sandy left behind," Bloomberg said.

Deputy Mayor Cas Holloway acknowledged many families and businesses have more recovery work to do after the storm.

"And we are right there doing it with them," he said.

Follow Anna Sanders on Twitter: @AnnaESanders

 
 
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