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G train ridership grows, but service is still lacking

The G train had the largest percentage average weekday increase in 2012.

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There are certain feelings that come with riding the G train. Anger, frustration, exasperation and impatience all perfectly describe the experience. There’s a reason the only line that connects Brooklyn and Queens has been nicknamed “The Ghost Train.”

According to theMTA's newly released 2012 ridership data,the G train had the largest percentage growth in average weekday ridership. The line grew 4.2 percent in popularity, which translates to about 2,000 riders per weekday.

The increase is likely due to Brooklyn’s rise in popularity as well as the Barclays Center opening last September.

Despite the surge in ridership, the lackluster service remains the same.

“The MTA’s new numbers show what G train riders already know. These trains are overcrowded, and we need to run more of them,” Riders Alliance Executive Director Josh Raskin said in a statement.

G trains do not run often, and because of that are usually packed.

“Service is not frequent enough to say to myself, ‘Oh, I’ll just wait for the next one.’ The next one could be 12 minutes away. I love my fellow Brooklynites, but I am tired of spending my mornings pressed up against them,” said Rider’s Alliance member Annemarie Caruso.

MTA spokesman Kevin Ortiz released the following statement to Gothamist:

“We will of course use the latest ridership figures as we assess G Line service, but total ridership is only one of the elements we use to determine levels of service. Transit schedules are, in fact, based on ridership through the peak load point of a route at any given time, and these measurements are taken a minimum of three times each year. The last time we looked at ridership trends, the level of service on the G was sufficient, but we will continue to analyze.”

Follow Mary Ann Georgantopoulos on Twitter @marygeorgant

 
 
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