Neighbor: Kayakers, great white were both there for the seals

The two kayakers who were dumped into the ocean as a result of a great white shark attack yesterday were trying to take photos of seals on rocks just off the Plymouth shoreline, according to one neighbor.

A great white shark took a bite out of a kayak near Plymouth last night. Credit: Discovery Channel A great white shark took a bite out of a kayak near Plymouth last night. Credit: Discovery Channel

 

The two kayakers who were dumped into the ocean as a result of a great white shark attack yesterday were trying to take photos of seals on rocks just off the Plymouth shoreline, according to one neighbor.

 

According to multiple media outlets, a great white shark bit a kayak within two hundred yards of shore last night. The duo ended up in the ocean, albeit unharmed, as a result of the attack.

 

 

Sean Mullin, who lives about 250 yards from the site of the attack, said it was the first such incident he was aware of in the 28 years he has lived on the beach.

He attributed the attack to the presence of seals in the area.[embedgallery id=450355]

"When we first moved down here, you would never see a seal. Now they're here year-round. They cover the rocks. They wake me up every morning," he said. "Animals like the great white, they're going to be where the food is."

Mullin said the presence of a great white does not make him nervous.

"You have to be aware of your surroundings," he said. "If you want to take a 40-pound kayak out to get close to the seals to take photos of them, that's fine. You just have to realize someone else might be interested in the seals as well."

He said the attack took place within 200 yards of shore, where the water is about 10 feet deep.

"He came up from underneath and took a bite out of the kayak, that's how they were able to tell it was a great white," he said. "It knocked them both in the water."

Last week, shark sightings prompted Duxbury to briefly close down its beaches.

 
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