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Group: Stop-and-frisk problems persist in city

Center for Constitutional Rights is suing city.

Despite NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly's attempts to overhaul the department's stop, question and frisk methods amid a lawsuit against them, the group suing the city said pernicious problems persist.

The latest report from that group, the Center for Constitutional Rights, examines data from January 2010 to June 2012, which they say shows no change in the proportion of stops and other statistics.

Stops decreased between April and September 2012, but the high rate of racial disparities and low rate of arrests and weapons recovery remained, CCR reported.

The number of stops between Jan. 1 and March 31 was the highest of any quarter on record, they said.

Last year there were 685,724 stops, up from 601,285 in 2010. This was more than three times the increase between 2010 and 2009, when there were a total of 576,394 stops. Between January and June this year, there were 337,410 stops.

Back in May, Commissioner Kelly said in a letter that the captains of each precinct would personally audit all stop-and-frisk reports, and public complaints would be tracked per officer.

Deputy Commissioner Paul Browne told Metro these measures have been put in place and have resulted in fewer stops.

Browne also said, "Stops save lives and they comport with descriptions provided by victims of violent crime."

However, the federal judge presiding over the lawsuit, Shira Sheindlin, has ruled that the city cannot argue that reduction in crime is a result of stops, because the low percentage of weapons seized indicates otherwise. Less than 1 percent of stops result in weapon seizures, according to the CCR.

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