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'Underdog' Joe Lhota unconcerned about second early poll showing Bill de Blasio with a strong lead

Democratic candidate Bill de Blasio has a huge lead over Republican Joe Lhota in the race for mayor, a second poll has suggested this week.

Public Advocate Bill de Blasio is crushing former MTA chairman Joe Lhota in a second poll this week of the mayor's race.  Credit: Getty Images Public Advocate Bill de Blasio is crushing former MTA chairman Joe Lhota in a second poll this week of the mayor's race.
Credit: Getty Images

Democratic candidate Bill de Blasio has a huge lead over Republican Joe Lhota in the race for mayor, a second poll has suggested this week.

Among likely voters, the Public Advocate has a majority 66 percent, with the former MTA chairman and deputy mayor trailing at just 25 percent, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released Thursday.

Despite the poor showing twice in one week, Lhota said he wasn't worried and that he expected to be in this position.

"I love being in the underdog position, it gives me an opportunity to do all the things that I want to do," Lhota said on the steps of City Hall. "I won't be defending a position, I'll be on offense the whole time."

Still, the new poll, which surveyed 891 likely voters, also showed de Blasio with a strong base among minorities, with 90 percent of blacks and 68 percent of Hispanics polled saying they supported him.

"The Quinnipiac numbers show he's doing in the general election at this stage of the game just what he did in the primary," Maurice Carroll, director of the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute, explained at City Hall.

"He's putting together the same kind of coalition—coalition of minorities," Carroll added. "Okay among white voters, gang-busters among blacks and Hispanics."

The majority of white voters polled, 52 percent, supported de Blasio.

Lhota stressed that the results were "early."

"You'll see these polls change over time, I'm sure," he said.

The poll of likely voters had a margin of error plus or minus 3.3 percentage points. Only 11 percent of those polled were Republicans.

Follow Anna Sanders on Twitter: @AnnaESanders

 
 
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